Best Selling Audio Books in History - Africa

Discover best selling audio books in history - africa from local library. Read book reviews and check book availability from public library with one click.

For more book recommendations, please check out New York Times® Best Sellers, Children's Book Recommendations or the complete list of Featured Book Lists and Award Winners

Share
11 - 20 of 286 results
<< >>
release date: Apr 01, 2014
Check price
Skeletons on the Zahara: A True Story of Survival
[Read by Michael Prichard]

A crucial, forgotten chapter of American history brilliantly retold for a new generation. Everywhere hailed as a masterpiece of historical adventure, this enthralling narrative recounts the experiences of twelve American sailors who were shipwrecked off the coast of Africa in 1815, captured by desert nomads, sold into slavery, and subjected to a hellish twomonth journey through the bonedry heart of the Sahara. The ordeal of these men who found themselves tested by barbarism, murder, starvation, death, dehydration, and hostile tribes that roamed the desert on camelback is made indelibly vivid in this gripping account of courage, brotherhood, and survival.
release date: Apr 24, 2018
Check price
The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After
A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“The plot provided by the universe was filled with starvation, war and rape. I would not—could not—live in that tale.”

 
Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when her mother and father began to speak in whispers, when neighbors began to disappear, and when she heard the loud, ugly sounds her brother said were thunder. In 1994, she and her fifteen-year-old sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan massacre and spent the next six years migrating through seven African countries, searching for safety—perpetually hungry, imprisoned and abused, enduring and escaping refugee camps, finding unexpected kindness, witnessing inhuman cruelty. They did not know whether their parents were dead or alive.
 
When Clemantine was twelve, she and her sister were granted refugee status in the United States; there, in Chicago, their lives diverged. Though their bond remained unbreakable, Claire, who had for so long protected and provided for Clemantine, was a single mother struggling to make ends meet, while Clemantine was taken in by a family who raised her as their own. She seemed to live the American dream: attending private school, taking up cheerleading, and, ultimately, graduating from Yale. Yet the years of being treated as less than human, of going hungry and seeing death, could not be erased. She felt at the same time six years old and one hundred years old.
 
In The Girl Who Smiled Beads, Clemantine provokes us to look beyond the label of “victim” and recognize the power of the imagination to transcend even the most profound injuries and aftershocks. Devastating yet beautiful, and bracingly original, it is a powerful testament to her commitment to constructing a life on her own terms.
release date: May 15, 2018
Check price
Enemies in Love: A German POW, a Black Nurse, and an Unlikely Romance
Fascinating and highly readable, Digital Resilience opens with the infamous 2013 Target attack, which compromised the credit card information of 40 million customers. In hindsight, the hack (like most today) was preventable. This book helps businesses:

- Understand the threats they face

- Assess the resilience of their networks against attacks

- Identify and address weaknesses

- Respond to exploits swiftly and effectively

Data theft. Downed servers. Malware. Even human error can trigger cyber events anytime from anywhere around the globe. This powerful guide provides the resilience-building strategies you need to prevail-no matter what strikes.
release date: Mar 15, 2006
Check price
Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst The Rwandan Holocaust
Immaculee Ilibagiza grew up in a country she loved, surrounded by a family she cherished. But in 1994 her idyllic world was ripped apart as Rwanda descended into a bloody genocide. Immaculee’ family was brutally murdered during a killing spree that lasted three months and claimed the lives of nearly a million Rwandans.Incredibly, Immaculee survived the slaughter. For 91 days, she and seven other women huddled silently together in the cramped bathroom of a local pastor while hundreds of machete-wielding killers hunted for them.It was during those endless hours of unspeakable terror that Immaculee discovered the power of prayer, eventually shedding her fear of death and forging a profound and lasting relationship with God. She emerged from her bathroom hideout having discovered the meaning of truly unconditional love— love so strong she was able seek out and forgive her family’ killers.The triumphant story of this remarkable young woman’ journey through the darkness of genocide will inspire anyone whose life has been touched by fear, suffering, and loss.
release date: Apr 01, 2005
Check price
Robert F. Williams: Self Respect, Self Defense & Self Determination (AK Press Audio)

Robert Williams organized African American armed self-defense in the South. President of the NAACP in Monroe, North Carolina, he led the black community in preventing Ku Klux Klan attacks and opposing the racism of governmental agencies. He was falsely accused of kidnapping charges by the FBI and was forced into exile. Williams lived in Cuba and China from 1961–1969. From Cuba he broadcast Radio Free Dixie, which aired the message of black liberation to the southern United States. He built strong relationships with world leaders like Fidel Castro, Che Guevara and Mao Tse Tung and organized international support for the human rights struggles of African Americans.

This audio documentary chronicles Williams’ life through his interviews and speeches and is narrated by his widow, Mabel Williams.

release date: Jul 31, 2018
Check price
Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy
Why do white supremacist politics in America remain so powerful? Elizabeth Gillespie McRae argues that the answer lies with white women.

Examining racial segregation from 1920s to the 1970s, Mothers of Massive Resistance explores the grassroots workers who maintained the system of racial segregation and Jim Crow. For decades in rural communities, in university towns, and in New South cities, white women performed myriad duties that upheld white over black: censoring textbooks, denying marriage certificates, deciding on the racial identity of their neighbors, celebrating school choice, canvassing communities for votes, and lobbying elected officials. They instilled beliefs in racial hierarchies in their children, built national networks, and experimented with a color-blind political discourse.


With white women at the center of the story, the rise of postwar conservatism looks very different than the male-dominated narratives of the resistance to Civil Rights. Women like Nell Battle Lewis, Florence Sillers Ogden, Mary Dawson Cain, and Cornelia Dabney Tucker publicized threats to their Jim Crow world through political organizing, private correspondence, and journalism. Their efforts began before World War II and the Brown decision and persisted past the 1964 Civil Rights Act and anti-busing protests.
release date: Nov 19, 2013
Check price
Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela is one of the great moral and political leaders of our time: an international hero whose lifelong dedication to the fight against racial oppression in South Africa won him the Nobel Peace Prize and the presidency of his country. Since his triumphant release in 1990 from more than a quarter-century of imprisonment, Mandela has been at the center of the most compelling and inspiring political drama in the world. As president of the African National Congress and head of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement, he was instrumental in moving the nation toward multiracial government and majority rule. He is revered everywhere as a vital force in the fight for human rights and racial equality. The foster son of a Thembu chief, Mandela was raised in the traditional, tribal culture of his ancestors, but at an early age learned the modern, inescapable reality of what came to be called apartheid, one of the most powerful and effective systems of oppression ever conceived. In classically elegant and engrossing prose, he tells of his early years as an impoverished student and law clerk in Johannesburg, of his slow political awakening, and of his pivotal role in the rebirth of a stagnant ANC and the formation of its Youth League in the 1950s. He describes the struggle to reconcile his political activity with his devotion to his family, the anguished breakup of his first marriage, and the painful separations from his children. He brings vividly to life the escalating political warfare in the fifties between the ANC and the government, culminating in his dramatic escapades as an underground leader and the notorious Rivonia Trial of 1964, at which he was sentenced to life imprisonment. Herecounts the surprisingly eventful twenty-seven years in prison and the complex, delicate negotiations that led both to his freedom and to the beginning of the end of apartheid. Finally he provides the ultimate inside account.
release date: Apr 17, 2018
Check price
The Burning Shores: Inside the Battle for the New Libya
The death of Colonel Muammar Qadhafi freed Libya from forty-two years of despotic rule, raising hopes for a new era. But in the aftermath, the country descended into bitter rivalries and civil war, paving the way for the Islamic State and a catastrophic migrant crisis.

In a fast-paced narrative that blends frontline reporting, analysis, and history, Frederic Wehrey tells the story of what went wrong. An Arabic-speaking Middle East scholar, Wehrey interviewed the key actors in Libya and paints vivid portraits of lives upended by a country in turmoil: the once-hopeful activists murdered or exiled, revolutionaries transformed into militia bosses or jihadist recruits, an aging general who promises salvation from the chaos in exchange for a return to the old authoritarianism. He traveled where few or no Western journalists have gone, from the shattered city of Benghazi, birthplace of the revolution, to the lawless Sahara, to the coastal stronghold of the Islamic State in Qadhafi's hometown of Sirte. He chronicles the American and international missteps after the dictator's death that led to the country's unraveling.
release date: Nov 22, 2013
Check price
Market Imaginary

Dakar's famous Colobane market is characterized by the saying, "You can find anything in the world at Colobane Market." This DVD explores the market in relation to its neighborhood, the city, and the human imagination. The objects populating the stalls―used clothing, shoes, watches, radios, and cell phones―oblige the eye and the imagination, inviting visitors to speculate about the networks and histories that have brought these people and these objects together in this place. A 53-minute film, Market Imaginary explores an alternative world of commerce and the possibilities it offers for the transformation of secondhand goods.

Discover more books in the following subjects:
release date: Feb 13, 2018
Check price
The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African-american Culinary History in the Old South
Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touchpoints in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes listeners to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine.

Twitty travels from the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields to tell of the struggles his family faced and how food enabled his ancestors' survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and visits Civil War battlefields in Virginia, synagogues in Alabama, and black-owned organic farms in Georgia.

As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the South's past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep-the power of food to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.
11 - 20 of 286 results
<< >>


  • Copyright © 2018 Link2Library Inc.