New Release Books by Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang is the author of The Blue Poetry Book (2021), The Animal Story Book (2021), Andrew Lang (2021), The Arabian Nights (2021) and other 496 books.

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The Blue Poetry Book

release date: Dec 02, 2021

The Animal Story Book

release date: Nov 16, 2021
The Animal Story Book
"Some of the first, and best, stories we ever hear in our lives."—Washington Post The Animal Story Book, part of Andrew Lang’s original Fairy Book series, has been admired time and time again, enchanting readers with its carefully crafted prose and eclectic assortment of tales, featuring animals from land, sea, and air, from the domesticated dog and parrot to the wild lion and dolphin. Originally published in 1896, this collection of celebrated tales has stood the test of time. Some of the famous stories included are: The Story of Androcles and the Lion The War Horse of Alexander The Adventures of Pyramus Two Highland Dogs The Ship of the Desert The Otter Who was Reared by a Cat Stories from Pliny And more! This beautiful edition comes complete with the original illustrations by Golden Age Illustrator Henry J. Ford, and is the perfect gift to pass on these timeless classics to the next generation of readers and dreamers. The imaginations of children throughout time have been formed and nurtured by stories passed down from generation to generation. Of the countless genres of stories, fairy tales often conjure the most vivid fantastical worlds and ideas, which cultivate creativity and bring elements of magic back into the real world. The Fairy Books, and its subsequent collections, compiled by famous Scottish novelist and poet Andrew Lang, are widely considered among some of the best collections ever compiled.

Andrew Lang

release date: Nov 02, 2021
Andrew Lang
For 3,000 years, the woman known as Helen of Troy has been both the ideal symbol of beauty and a reminder of the terrible power beauty can wield.In her search for the identity behind this mythic figure, acclaimed historian Bettany Hughes uses Homer''s account of Helen''s life to frame her own investigation. Tracing the cultural impact that Helen has had on both the ancient world and Western civilization, Hughes explores Helen''s role and representations in literature and in art throughout the ages. This is a masterly work of historical inquiry about one of the world''s most famous women.

The Arabian Nights

release date: Sep 11, 2021
The Arabian Nights
The Arabian Nights Andrew Lang - One Thousand and One Nights is a collection of stories collected over many centuries by various authors, translators and scholars in various countries across the Middle East and South Asia. These collections of tales trace their roots back to ancient Arabia and Yemen, ancient Indian literature and Persian literature, ancient Egyptian literature and Mesopotamian mythology, ancient Syria and Asia Minor, and medieval Arabic folk stories from the Caliphate era. Though the oldest Arabic manuscript dates from the fourteenth century, scholarship generally dates the collection''s genesis to somewhere between AD 800900.

The Prince & Princess Story Book

release date: Oct 19, 2021
The Prince & Princess Story Book
"Some of the first, and best, stories we ever hear in our lives."—Washington Post The Prince & Princess Story Book (originally The Book of Princes and Princesses), part of Andrew Lang’s original Fairy Book series, has been admired time and time again, enchanting readers with its carefully crafted prose and eclectic assortment of true historical tales, written by Leonora Lang, Andrew Lang’s wife, and featuring rulers from all across history. Originally published in 1908, this collection of celebrated figures has stood the test of time. Some of the famous stories included are: Napoleon The Red Rose The White Rose Frederick and Wilhelmine The Troubles of the Princess Elizabeth And more! This beautiful edition comes complete with the original illustrations by Golden Age Illustrator Henry J. Ford, and is the perfect gift to pass on these timeless classics to the next generation of readers and dreamers. The imaginations of children throughout time have been formed and nurtured by stories passed down from generation to generation. Of the countless genres of stories, fairy tales often conjure the most vivid fantastical worlds and ideas, which cultivate creativity and bring elements of magic back into the real world. The Fairy Books, and its subsequent collections, compiled by famous Scottish novelist and poet Andrew Lang, are widely considered among some of the best collections ever compiled.

The Homeric Hymns

release date: Mar 16, 2021

The Red Fairy Book

The Red Fairy Book
The Red Fairy Book appeared at Christmas 1890 in a first printing of 10,000 copies. Sources include French, Russian, Danish, and Romanian tales as well as Norse mythology.

The Violet Fairy Book

The Violet Fairy Book
A collection of several short fairy tales by the noted Scottish poet, novelist, literary critic, and anthropologist Andrew Lang. These tales are first English translations of fairy tales from many different languages. This volume was published in a colour-coded manner with violet at the background of each of the pages. He published around 25 such volumes with different colour codes for each. These volumes got immensely popular at that pont of time.

Oxford

Oxford
These papers do not profess even to sketch the outlines of a history of Oxford. They are merely records of the impressions made by this or that aspect of the life of the University as it has been in different ages. Oxford is not an easy place to design in black and white, with the pen or the etcher''s needle. On a wild winter or late autumn day (such as Father Faber has made permanent in a beautiful poem) the sunshine fleets along the plain, revealing towers, and floods, and trees, in a gleam of watery light, and leaving them once more in shadow. The melancholy mist creeps over the city, the damp soaks into the heart of everything, and such suicidal weather ensues as has been described, once for all, by the author of John-a-Dreams. How different Oxford looks when the road to Cowley Marsh is dumb with dust, when the heat seems almost tropical, and by the drowsy banks of the Cherwell you might almost expect some shy southern water-beast to come crashing through the reeds! And such a day, again, is unlike the bright weather of late September, when all the gold and scarlet of Bagley Wood are concentrated in the leaves that cover the walls of Magdalen with an imperial vesture.

Books and Bookmen

Books and Bookmen
The Countryman. "You know how much, for some time past, the editions of the Elzevirs have been in demand. The fancy for them has even penetrated into the country. I am acquainted with a man there who denies himself necessaries, for the sake of collecting into a library (where other books are scarce enough) as many little Elzevirs as he can lay his hands upon. He is dying of hunger, and his consolation is to be able to say, ''I have all the poets whom the Elzevirs printed. I have ten examples of each of them, all with red letters, and all of the right date.'' This, no doubt, is a craze, for, good as the books are, if he kept them to read them, one example of each would be enough." The Parisian. "If he had wanted to read them, I would not have advised him to buy Elzevirs. The editions of minor authors which these booksellers published, even editions ''of the right date,'' as you say, are not too correct. Nothing is good in the books but the type and the paper. Your friend would have done better to use the editions of Gryphius or Estienne." This fragment of a literary dialogue I translate from ''Entretiens sur les Contes de Fees,'' a book which contains more of old talk about books and booksellers than about fairies and folk-lore. The ''Entretiens'' were published in 1699, about sixteen years after the Elzevirs ceased to be publishers. The fragment is valuable: first, because it shows us how early the taste for collecting Elzevirs was fully developed, and, secondly, because it contains very sound criticism of the mania. Already, in the seventeenth century, lovers of the tiny Elzevirian books waxed pathetic over dates, already they knew that a ''Caesar'' of 1635 was the right ''Caesar,'' already they were fond of the red-lettered passages, as in the first edition of the ''Virgil'' of 1636. As early as 1699, too, the Parisian critic knew that the editions were not very correct, and that the paper, type, ornaments, and FORMAT were their main attractions. To these we must now add the rarity of really good Elzevirs.

The Library

The Library
The best time for book-hunting in Paris is the early morning. "The take," as anglers say, is "on" from half-past seven to half-past nine a.m. At these hours the vendors exhibit their fresh wares, and the agents of the more wealthy booksellers come and pick up everything worth having. These agents quite spoil the sport of the amateur. They keep a strict watch on every country dealer''s catalogue, snap up all he has worth selling, and sell it over again, charging pounds in place of shillings. But M. de Resbecq vows that he once picked up a copy of the first edition of La Rochefoucauld''s "Maxims" out of a box which two booksellers had just searched. The same collector got together very promptly all the original editions of La Bruyere, and he even found a copy of the Elzevir "Pastissier Francais," at the humble price of six sous. Now the " Pastissier Francais," an ill-printed little cookery-book of the Elzevirs, has lately fetched 600 pounds at a sale. The Antiquary''s story of Snuffy Davy and the "Game of Chess," is dwarfed by the luck of M. de Resbecq. Not one amateur in a thousand can expect such good fortune. There is, however, a recent instance of a Rugby boy, who picked up, on a stall, a few fluttering leaves hanging together on a flimsy thread. The old woman who kept the stall could hardly be induced to accept the large sum of a shilling for an original quarto of Shakespeare''s "King John." These stories are told that none may despair. That none may be over confident, an author may recount his own experience. The only odd trouvaille that ever fell to me was a clean copy of "La Journee Chretienne," with the name of Leon Gambetta, 1844, on its catholic fly-leaf. Rare books grow rarer every day, and often ''tis only Hope that remains at the bottom of the fourpenny boxes. Yet the Paris book-hunters cleave to the game.

The Red True Story Book

release date: Oct 14, 2014

Ballads in Blue China

release date: Mar 01, 2015
Ballads in Blue China
Thirty years have passed, like a watch in the night, since the earlier of the two sets of verses here reprinted, Ballades in Blue China, was published. At first there were but twenty-two Ballades; ten more were added later. They appeared in a little white vellum wrapper, with a little blue Chinese singer copied from a porcelain jar; and the frontispiece was a little design by an etcher now famous. Thirty years ago blue china was a kind of fetish in some circles, aesthetic circles, of which the balladist was not a member. The ballade was an old French form of verse, in France revived by Theodore de Banville, and restored to an England which had long forgotten the Middle Ages, by my friends Mr. Austin Dobson and Mr. Edmund Gosse. They, so far as I can trust my memory, were the first to reintroduce these pleasant old French nugae, while an anonymous author let loose upon the town a whole winged flock of ballades of amazing dexterity. This unknown balladist was Mr. Henley; perhaps he was the first Englishman who ever burst into a double ballade, and his translations of two of Villon''s ballades into modern thieves'' slang were marvels of dexterity. Mr. Swinburne wrote a serious ballade, but the form, I venture to think, is not ''wholly serious,'' of its nature, in modern days; and he did not persevere. Nor did the taste for these trifles long endure. A good ballade is almost as rare as a good sonnet, but a middling ballade is almost as easily written as the majority of sonnets. Either form readily becomes mechanical, cheap and facile. I have heard Mr. George Meredith improvise a sonnet, a Petrarchian sonnet, obedient to the rules, without pen and paper. He spoke ''and the numbers came''; he sonneted as easily as a living poet, in his Eton days, improvised Latin elegiacs and Greek hexameters.

Tales of Troy: Ulysses, the Sacker of Cities

Tales of Troy: Ulysses, the Sacker of Cities
Long ago, in a little island called Ithaca, on the west coast of Greece, there lived a king named Laertes. His kingdom was small and mountainous. People used to say that Ithaca Òlay like a shield upon the sea,Ó which sounds as if it were a flat country. But in those times shields were very large, and rose at the middle into two peaks with a hollow between them, so that Ithaca, seen far off in the sea, with her two chief mountain peaks, and a cloven valley between them, looked exactly like a shield. The country was so rough that men kept no horses, for, at that time, people drove, standing up in little light chariots with two horses; they never rode, and there was no cavalry in battle: men fought from chariots. When Ulysses, the son of Laertes, King of Ithaca grew up, he never fought from a chariot, for he had none, but always on foot. If there were no horses in Ithaca, there was plenty of cattle. The father of Ulysses had flocks of sheep, and herds of swine, and wild goats, deer, and hares lived in the hills and in the plains. The sea was full of fish of many sorts, which men caught with nets, and with rod and line and hook. Thus Ithaca was a good island to live in. The summer was long, and there was hardly any winter; only a few cold weeks, and then the swallows came back, and the plains were like a garden, all covered with wild flowersÑviolets, lilies, narcissus, and roses. With the blue sky and the blue sea, the island was beautiful. White temples stood on the shores; and the Nymphs, a sort of fairies, had their little shrines built of stone, with wild rose-bushes hanging over them.

Helen of Troy

Helen of Troy
The character and history of Helen of Troy have been conceived of in very different ways by poets and mythologists. In attempting to trace the chief current of ancient traditions about Helen, we cannot really get further back than the Homeric poems, the Iliad and Odyssey. Philological conjecture may assure us that Helen, like most of the characters of old romance, is Òmerely the Dawn,Ó or Light, or some other bright being carried away by Paris, who represents Night, or Winter, or the Cloud, or some other power of darkness. Without discussing these ideas, it may be said that the Greek poets (at all events before allegorical explanations of mythology came in, about five hundred years before Christ) regarded Helen simply as a woman of wonderful beauty. Homer was not thinking of the Dawn, or the Cloud when he described Helen among the Elders on the Ilian walls, or repeated her lament over the dead body of Hector. The Homeric poems are our oldest literary documents about Helen, but it is probable enough that the poet has modified and purified more ancient traditions which still survive in various fragments of Greek legend. In Homer Helen is always the daughter of Zeus. Isocrates tells us (ÒHelena,Ó 211 b) that Òwhile many of the demigods were children of Zeus, he thought the paternity of none of his daughters worth claiming, save that of Helen only.Ó In Homer, then, Helen is the daughter of Zeus, but Homer says nothing of the famous legend which makes Zeus assume the form of a swan to woo the mother of Helen. Unhomeric as this myth is, we may regard it as extremely ancient. Very similar tales of pursuit and metamorphosis, for amatory or other purposes, among the old legends of Wales, and in the ÒArabian Nights,Ó as well as in the myths of Australians and Red Indians. Again, the belief that different families of mankind descend from animals, as from the Swan, or from gods in the shape of animals, is found in every quarter of the world, and among the rudest races. Many Australian natives of to-day claim descent, like the royal house of Sparta, from the Swan. The Greek myths hesitated as to whether Nemesis or Leda was the bride of the Swan. Homer only mentions Leda among Òthe wives and daughters of mighty men,Ó whose ghosts Odysseus beheld in Hades: ÒAnd I saw Leda, the famous bedfellow of Tyndareus, who bare to Tyndareus two sons, hardy of heart, Castor, tamer of steeds, and the boxer Polydeuces.Ó These heroes Helen, in the Iliad (iii. 238), describes as her motherÕs sons. Thus, if Homer has any distinct view on the subject, he holds that Leda is the mother of Helen by Zeus, of the Dioscuri by Tyndareus.

Tales of Troy and Greece

Tales of Troy and Greece
Long ago, in a little island called Ithaca, on the west coast of Greece, there lived a king named Laertes. His kingdom was small and mountainous. People used to say that Ithaca ''lay like a shield upon the sea,'' which sounds as if it were a flat country. But in those times shields were very large, and rose at the middle into two peaks with a hollow between them, so that Ithaca, seen far off in the sea, with her two chief mountain peaks, and a cloven valley between them, looked exactly like a shield. The country was so rough that men kept no horses, for, at that time, people drove, standing up in little light chariots with two horses; they never rode, and there was no cavalry in battle: men fought from chariots. When Ulysses, the son of Laertes, King of Ithaca grew up, he never fought from a chariot, for he had none, but always on foot. If there were no horses in Ithaca, there was plenty of cattle. The father of Ulysses had flocks of sheep, and herds of swine, and wild goats, deer, and hares lived in the hills and in the plains. The sea was full of fish of many sorts, which men caught with nets, and with rod and line and hook. Thus Ithaca was a good island to live in. The summer was long, and there was hardly any winter; only a few cold weeks, and then the swallows came back, and the plains were like a garden, all covered with wild flowersÑviolets, lilies, narcissus, and roses. With the blue sky and the blue sea, the island was beautiful. White temples stood on the shores; and the Nymphs, a sort of fairies, had their little shrines built of stone, with wild rose-bushes hanging over them. Other islands lay within sight, crowned with mountains, stretching away, one behind the other, into the sunset. Ulysses in the course of his life saw many rich countries, and great cities of men, but, wherever he was, his heart was always in the little isle of Ithaca, where he had learned how to row, and how to sail a boat, and how to shoot with bow and arrow, and to hunt boars and stags, and manage his hounds.

The Strange Story Book

The Strange Story Book
The story of Wolfert Webber was said by Louis Stevenson to be one of the finest treasure-seeking stories in the world; and as Stevenson was a very good judge, I am going to tell it to you. Wolfert''s ancestor, Cobus Webber, was one of the original settlers who came over from Holland and established themselves on the coast of what is now the State of New York. Like most of his countrymen, Cobus was a great gardener, and devoted himself especially to cabbages, and it was agreed on all sides that none so large or so sweet had ever been eaten by anybody. Webber''s house was built after the Dutch pattern, and was large and comfortable. Birds built their nests under the eaves and filled the air with their singing, and a button-wood tree, which was nothing but a sapling when Cobus planted his first cabbage, had become a monster overshadowing half the garden in the days of his descendant Wolfert early in the eighteenth century. The button-wood tree was not the only thing that had grown during those years. The city known at first as ''New Amsterdam,'' and later as ''New York,'' had grown also, and surrounded the house of the Webbers. But if the family could no longer look from the windows at the beautiful woods and rivers of the countryside, as their forefathers had done, there was no reason to drive a cart about from one village to another to see who wanted cabbages, for now the housewives came to Wolfert to choose their own, which saved a great deal of trouble. Yet, though Wolfert sold all the cabbages he could raise,Êhe did not become rich as fast as he wished, and at length he began to wonder if he was becoming rich at all. Food was dearer than when he was a boy, and other people besides himself had taken to cabbage-growing. His daughter was nearly a woman, and would want a portion if she married. Was there no way by which he could make the money that would be so badly needed by and bye?

Letters on Literature

Letters on Literature
These Letters were originally published in the Independent of New York. The idea of writing them occurred to the author after he had produced ÒLetters to Dead s.Ó That kind of Epistle was open to the objection that nobody would write so frankly to a correspondent about his own work, and yet it seemed that the form of Letters might be attempted again. The Lettres ˆ Emilie sur la Mythologie are a well-known model, but Emilie was not an imaginary correspondent. The persons addressed here, on the other hand, are all people of fancyÑthe name of Lady Violet Lebas is an invention of Mr. ThackerayÕs: gifted Hopkins is the minor poet in Dr. Oliver Wendell HolmesÕs ÒGuardian Angel.Ó The authorÕs object has been to discuss a few literary topics with more freedom and personal bias than might be permitted in a graver kind of essay. The Letter on Samuel Richardson is by a lady more frequently the authorÕs critic than his collaborator.

A Collection of Ballads

A Collection of Ballads
Instances perpetually occur in the Sagas: Grettir, Egil, Skarphedin, are always singing. InKidnapped, Mr. Stevenson introduces ÒThe Song of the Sword of Alan,Ó a fine example of Celtic practice: words and air are beaten out together, in the heat of victory. In the same way, the women sang improvised dirges, like Helen; lullabies, like the lullaby of Danae in Simonides, and flower songs, as in modern Italy. Every function of life, war, agriculture, the chase, had its appropriate magical and mimetic dance and song, as in Finland, among Red Indians, and among Australian blacks. ÒThe deeds of menÓ were chanted by heroes, as by Achilles; stories were told in alternate verse and prose; girls, like HomerÕs Nausicaa, accompanied dance and ball play, priests and medicine-men accompanied rites and magical ceremonies by songs. These practices are world-wide, and world-old. The thoroughly popular songs, thus evolved, became the rude material of a professional class of minstrels, when these arose, as in the heroic age of Greece. A minstrel might be attached to a Court, or a noble; or he might go wandering with song and harp among the people. In either case, this class of men developed more regular and ample measures. They evolved the hexameter; the laisse of the Chansons de Geste; the strange technicalities of Scandinavian poetry; the metres of Vedic hymns; the choral odes of Greece. The narrative popular chant became in their hands the Epic, or the mediaeval rhymed romance. The metre of improvised verse changed into the artistic lyric. These lyric forms were fixed, in many cases, by the art of writing. But poetry did not remain solely in professional and literary hands. The mediaeval minstrels and jongleurs (who may best be studied in LŽon GautierÕs Introduction to his EpopŽes Fran�aises) sang in Court and Camp. The poorer, less regular brethren of the art, harped and played conjuring tricks, in farm and grange, or at street corners. The foreign newer metres took the place of the old alliterative English verse. But unprofessional men and women did not cease to make and sing.

King Arthur Tales of the Round Table

King Arthur Tales of the Round Table
A retelling of the exploits of King Arthur and his knights at the court of Camelot and elsewhere in the land of the Britons.

Ban and Arriere Ban: A Rally of Fugitive Rhymes

Ban and Arriere Ban: A Rally of Fugitive Rhymes
So for lang years three did they sweep the sea, but a closer watch was set, Till nae food had they, but twa ounce a day o’ meal was the maist they’d get. And men fight but tame on an empty wame, so they sent a flag o’ truce, And blithe were the Privy Council then, when the Whigs had heard that news. Twa Lords they sent wi’ a strang intent to be dour on each Cavalier, But wi’ French cakes fine, and his last drap o’ wine, did Middleton make them cheer, On the muzzles o’ guns he put coats and caps, and he set them aboot the wa’s, And the Whigs thocht then he had food and men to stand for the Rightfu’ Cause. So he got a’ he craved, and his men were saved, and nane might say them nay, Wi’ sword by side, and flag o’ pride, free men might they gang their way, They might fare to France, they might bide at hame, and the better their grace to buy, Wullie Wanbeard’s purse maun pay the keep o’ the men that did him defy!

The Blue Fairy Book Illustrated

release date: Aug 24, 2021
The Blue Fairy Book Illustrated
Andrew Lang''s Fairy Books or Andrew Lang''s "Coloured" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d''Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. The Blue Fairy Book assembled a wide range of tales, with seven from the Brothers Grimm, five from Madame d''Aulnoy, three from the Arabian Nights, and four Norse stories, among other sources

The Clyde Mystery: A Study in Forgeries and Folklore

The Clyde Mystery: A Study in Forgeries and Folklore
The author would scarcely have penned this little specimen of what Scott called Òantiquarian old womanries,Ó but for the interest which he takes in the universally diffused archaic patterns on rocks and stones, which offer a singular proof of the identity of the working of the human mind. Anthropology and folklore are the natural companions and aids of prehistoric and proto-historic archaeology, and suggest remarks which may not be valueless, whatever view we may take of the disputed objects from the Clyde sites. While only an open verdict on these objects is at present within the competence of science, the author, speaking for himself, must record his private opinion that, as a rule, they are ancient though anomalous. He cannot pretend to certainty as to whether the upper parts of the marine structures were throughout built of stone, as in Dr. MunroÕs theory, which is used as the fundamental assumption in this book; or whether they were of wood, as in the hypothesis of Mr. Donnelly, illustrated by him in the Glasgow Evening Times (Sept. 11, 1905). The point seems unessential. The author learns from Mr. Donnelly that experiments in shaping piles with an ancient stone axe have been made by Mr. Joseph Downes, of Irvine, as by Monsieur Hippolyte MŸller in France, with similar results, a fact which should have been mentioned in the book. It appears too, that a fragment of fallow deer horn at Dumbuck, mentioned by Dr. Munro, turned out to be Òa decayed humerus of the Bos Longifrons,Ó and therefore no evidence as to date, as post-Roman. Mr. Donnelly also protests that his records of his excavations Òwere exceptionally complete,Ó and that he Òtook daily notes and sketches of all features and finds with measurements.Ó I must mention these facts, as, in the book, I say that Mr. Donnelly Òkept no minute and hourly dated log book of his explorations, with full details as to the precise positions of the objects discovered.Ó

Prince Ricardo of Pantouflia: Being the Adventures of Prince Prigio's son

Prince Ricardo of Pantouflia: Being the Adventures of Prince Prigio's son
There may be children whose education has been so neglected that they have not read Prince Prigio. As this new story is about Prince PrigioÕs son, Ricardo, you are to learn that Prigio was the child and heir of Grognio, King of Pantouflia. The fairies gave the little Prince cleverness, beauty, courage; but one wicked fairy added, ÒYou shall be too clever.Ó His mother, the queen, hid away in a cupboard all the fairy presents,Ñthe Sword of Sharpness, the Seven-League Boots, the Wishing Cap, and many other useful and delightful gifts, in which her Majesty did not believe! But after Prince Prigio had become universally disliked and deserted, because he was so very clever and conceited, he happened to find all the fairy presents in the old turret chamber where they had been thrown. By means of these he delivered his country from a dreadful Red-Hot Beast, called the Firedrake, and, in addition to many other triumphs, he married the good and beautiful Lady Rosalind. His love for her taught him not to be conceited, though he did not cease to be extremely clever and fond of reading. When this new story begins the Prince has succeeded to the crown, on the death of King Grognio, and is unhappy about his own son, Prince Ricardo, who is not clever, and who hates books! The story tells of RicardoÕsadventures: how he tried to bring back Prince Charlie to England, how he failed; how he dealt with the odious old Yellow Dwarf; how he was aided by the fair magician, the Princess Jaqueline; how they both fell into a dreadful trouble; how King Prigio saved them; and how JaquelineÕs dear and royal papa was discovered; with the end of all these adventures. The moral of the story will easily be discovered by the youngest reader, or, if not, it does not much matter.

Grass of Parnassus

Grass of Parnassus
Many of the verses and translations in this volume were published first in Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872). Though very sensible that they have the demerits of imitative and even of undergraduate rhyme, I print them again because people I like have liked them. The rest are of different dates, and lack (though doubtless they need) the excuse of having been written, like some of the earlier pieces, during College Lectures. I would gladly have added to this volume what other more or less serious rhymes I have written, but circumstances over which I have no control have bound them up with Ballades, and other toys of that sort. It may be as well to repeat in prose, what has already been said in verse, that Grass of Parnassus, the pretty Autumn flower, grows in the marshes at the foot of the MusesÕ Hill, and other hills, not at the top by any means.

History of English Literature

release date: Aug 14, 2020
History of English Literature
Reproduction of the original: History of English Literature by Andrew Lang

The Secret of the Totem

release date: Aug 14, 2020
The Secret of the Totem
Reproduction of the original: The Secret of the Totem by Andrew Lang

XXXII Ballades in Blue China [1885]

release date: Aug 14, 2020
XXXII Ballades in Blue China [1885]
Reproduction of the original: XXXII Ballades in Blue China [1885] by Andrew Lang

The Crimson Fairy Book

release date: Apr 26, 2020
The Crimson Fairy Book
There was once a king''s son who told his father that he wished to marry.''No, no!'' said the king; ''you must not be in such a hurry. Wait till you have done some great deed. My father did not let me marry till I had won the golden sword you see me wear.''The prince was much disappointed, but he never dreamed of disobeying his father, and he began to think with all his might what he could do. It was no use staying at home, so one day he wandered out into the world to try his luck, and as he walked along he came to a little hut in which he found an old woman crouching over the fire.

The Blue Poetry Book; Illusatrated

release date: Jun 06, 2021
The Blue Poetry Book; Illusatrated
The Blue Poetry Book was the third of the series of Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. This book contains 153 poems by great British and American poets such as; William Blake; Elizabeth Browning; John Bunyan; Robert Burns; Lord Byron; Thomas Campbell; Samuel Coleridge Taylor; William Cowper; Charles Lamb, and many others.

The Grey Fairy Book Annotated

release date: Nov 09, 2021
The Grey Fairy Book Annotated
The tales in the Grey Fairy Book are derived from many countries Lithuania, various parts of Africa, Germany, France, Greece, and other regions of the world.

The Green Fairy Book Annotated

release date: Nov 04, 2021
The Green Fairy Book Annotated
The Green Fairy Book was the fourth of the series of Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Stories in this collection include: The Blue Bird; The Enchanted Watch; Rosanella; The Enchanted Snake; The Dirty Shepherdess; King Kojata; The Golden Lads; The Three Little Pigs; The Magic Swan; Spindle, Shuttle, and Needle; The Twelve Huntsmen; and many more.

The Orange Fairy Book Annotated

release date: Oct 30, 2021
The Orange Fairy Book Annotated
The Orange Fairy Book is the eighteenth volume in Andrew Lang''s Fairy Books. It contains 33 stories from Jutland, Rhodesia, Uganda, and other European traditions: The Story Of The Hero Makoma From The Senna (Oral Tradition); The Magic Mirror From The Senna; Story Of The King Who Would See Paradise; How Isuro The Rabbit Tricked Gudu; Ian, The Soldier''s Son; The Fox And The Wolf; How Ian Direach Got The Blue Falcon; The Ugly Duckling; The Two Caskets; The Goldsmith''s Fortune; The Enchanted Wreath; The Foolish Weaver; The Clever Cat; The Story Of Manus; Pinkel The Thief; The Adventures Of A Jackal; The Adventures Of The Jackal''s Eldest Son; The Adventures Of The Younger Son Of The Jackal; The Three Treasures Of The Giants; The Rover Of The Plain; The White Doe; The Girl-Fish; The Owl And The Eagle; The Frog And The Lion Fairy; The Adventures Of Covan The Brown-Haired; The Princess Bella-Flor; The Bird Of Truth; The Mink And The Wolf; Adventures Of An Indian Brave; How The Stalos Were Tricked; Andras Baive; The White Slipper; and, The Magic Book.
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