New Release Books by Magnus Henrekson

Magnus Henrekson is the author of The Entrepreneurial Society (2019), Institutional Reform for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (2020), Government Size and Implications for Economic Growth (2010), Competencies and Institutions Fostering High-growth Firms (2008) and other 20 books.

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The Entrepreneurial Society

release date: Aug 15, 2019
The Entrepreneurial Society
This open access book builds on the European Union’s (EU) Horizon 2020 project ‘Financial and Institutional Reforms for an Entrepreneurial Society’ (FIRES). The authors outline how Europe can move towards more inclusive, innovative and sustainable growth through reforms that will rekindle its entrepreneurial spirit. Based on decades of research and countless discussions with stakeholders, the book also features the FIRES project’s full list of policy interventions and institutional reforms that can help policymakers make that agenda a reality.

Institutional Reform for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

release date: Oct 08, 2020
Institutional Reform for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
The authors of this book advise the economies of the European Union to become more entrepreneurial in promoting innovation and economic growth. The authors propose a reform strategy with respect to several aspects to achieve this goal. Starting with the rule of law and the protection of property rights; the tax system; the authors deal with regulations governing savings, capital and finance, and the organization of labor markets and social insurance systems. Framework strategies related to the regulations governing goods and service markets, bankruptcy and insolvency are also put forward. A core understanding and future path is also provided towards R&D, commercialization and knowledge spillovers; human capital investments; and informal institutions. This work was published by Saint Philip Street Press pursuant to a Creative Commons license permitting commercial use. All rights not granted by the work's license are retained by the author or authors.

Government Size and Implications for Economic Growth

release date: Jul 16, 2010
Government Size and Implications for Economic Growth
Government Size and Economic Growth concludes that, in every case, economic freedom is a crucial determinant of economic growth_suggesting that government intervention in the marketplace may be the wrong approach to solving the economic crisis.

Competencies and Institutions Fostering High-growth Firms

release date: Nov 01, 2008
Competencies and Institutions Fostering High-growth Firms
The formalism of probabilistic graphical models provides a unifying framework for capturing complex dependencies among random variables, and building large-scale multivariate statistical models. Graphical models have become a focus of research in many statistical, computational and mathematical fields, including bioinformatics, communication theory, statistical physics, combinatorial optimization, signal and image processing, information retrieval and statistical machine learning. Many problems that arise in specific instances-including the key problems of computing marginals and modes of probability distributions-are best studied in the general setting. Working with exponential family representations, and exploiting the conjugate duality between the cumulant function and the entropy for exponential families, Graphical Models, Exponential Families and Variational Inference develops general variational representations of the problems of computing likelihoods, marginal probabilities and most probable configurations. It describes how a wide variety of algorithms- among them sum-product, cluster variational methods, expectation-propagation, mean field methods, and max-product-can all be understood in terms of exact or approximate forms of these variational representations. The variational approach provides a complementary alternative to Markov chain Monte Carlo as a general source of approximation methods for inference in large-scale statistical models.

Growth Effects of European Integration

release date: Jan 01, 1996

Economic Growth and the Swedish Model

release date: Jan 01, 1994

Entrepreneurship and Institutions

release date: Jul 24, 2017
Entrepreneurship and Institutions
Entrepreneurship and Institutions: A Bidirectional Relationship argues that the view that institutions determine the extent to which entrepreneurial activity is productive is only part of the story. Rather, causality is bidirectional, in that entrepreneurship is also, for better or for worse, one of the main drivers of institutional change.

A New Framework for Testing the Effect of Government Spending on Growth and Productivity

release date: Jan 01, 1993

Understanding Entrepreneurship

release date: Apr 01, 2016

Owner-Level Taxes and Business Activity

release date: Mar 08, 2016
Owner-Level Taxes and Business Activity
Owner-Level Taxes and Business Activity examines advances in both theoretical and empirical research that paint a clearer picture of the effects of owner-level taxation on business activity. A key lesson from this monograph is that the models used in economics are necessarily simplified. Moreover, it is important for political decision makers to be conscious of these simplifications when the conclusions derived from economic models motivate or are used to justify tax policy decisions. Conclusions from overly simplified models may thus change when additional factors are considered.

A Teenager in Hitler's Death Camps

release date: Jan 01, 2007
A Teenager in Hitler's Death Camps
A Romanian man recalls his survival during the Holocaust, when as a sixteen-year-old he and his family were sent first to Auschwitz and later on to two other concentration camps.

An Economic Analysis of Swedish Government Expenditure

release date: Jan 01, 1992
An Economic Analysis of Swedish Government Expenditure
The purpose of this study is to explain the expansion of government in Sweden, going as far back as data availability permits (1861). It applies modern time-series econometrics to the explanation of the oldest and most frequently cited explanation to the growth of government, namely, Wagner's Law. It also develops a new disequilibrium framework in order to identify whether supply or demand factors are most important in explaining government growth. Part 1 consists of a test of two classical theories of government growth: Wagner's Law and the displacement effect hypothesis and part 2 attempts to identify the most important factors behind the growth of government in Sweden since 1950. The author also identifies a number of variables potentially important to the explanation of the growth of government. Each variable is classified to pertain either to the supply or demand side.

Catching Up, Social Capability, Government Size and Economic Growth

release date: Jan 01, 1994

Catching Up in Industrialized Countries

release date: Jan 01, 1991

What Makes a Country Socially Capable of Catching Up?

release date: Jan 01, 1992

Dumbing Down

release date: May 12, 2022
Dumbing Down
This open access book examines the challenges and issues caused by a move to a privatized education system in Sweden. Observing the introduction of the school voucher system and the lowering of academic standards, the move away from objective knowledge towards constructive knowledge is identified as the core reason for Sweden’s current education crisis. The impact of declining education standards on the labor market is also discussed. This book highlight the issues seen in Sweden and suggests policies that can improve education, not just in Sweden but the rest of the world as well. It will be relevant to students and researchers interested in education and labor economics.

Entrepreneurship Prompts Institutional Change in Developing Economies

release date: Jan 01, 2020
Entrepreneurship Prompts Institutional Change in Developing Economies
Entrepreneurship plays a pivotal role for institutional change and economic development in transition and developing economies. Formal and informal institutions in such countries are often sub-par, but rather than being constrained by them, entrepreneurship can often affect institutions and contribute to their evolution. We highlight three entrepreneurial responses to the institutional status quo: an abiding response, an altering response, and an evasive response. Each response can be either welfare-enhancing or welfare-reducing; more importantly, each response can affect the institutional framework of the society in which it occurs. Better knowledge of entrepreneurial responses to institutions and the context in which they occur offers a promising avenue for future research and a potential way of sustaining lasting institutional change and economic development.

Testing the Female Underperformance Hypothesis

release date: Jan 01, 1999

How Labor Market Institutions Affect Job Creation and Productivity Growth

release date: Jan 01, 2019
How Labor Market Institutions Affect Job Creation and Productivity Growth
Economic growth requires factor reallocation across firms and continuous replacement of technologies. Labor market institutions influence economic dynamism by their impact on the supply of a key factor, skilled workers to new and expanding firms, and the shedding of workers from declining and failing firms. Growth-favoring labor market institutions include portable pension plans and other job tenure rights, health insurance untied to the current employer, individualized wage-setting, and public income insurance systems that encourage mobility and risk-taking in the labor market.

Measuring Entrepreneurship

release date: Jan 01, 2019
Measuring Entrepreneurship
Are quantitative measures driven by small business activity also valid proxies for high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship? We compile four hand-collected measures of high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship (VC-funded IPOs, self-made billionaire entrepreneurs, unicorn start-ups, and young top global firms founded by individual entrepreneurs) and sixmeasures dominated by small business activity as well as institutional and economic variables for 64 countries. Factor analysis reveals that much of thevariation is accounted for by two distinct factors: one relating to high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship and the other relating to small business activity. Except for the World Bank measure of firm registration of limited liability companies quantity-based measures tend to be inappropriate proxies for high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship.

Collaborative Innovation Blocs and Antifragility

release date: Jan 01, 2019
Collaborative Innovation Blocs and Antifragility
We present the theory of the collaborative innovation bloc (CIB), an evolving system of innovation within which activity takes place over time. We show how the application of the CIB perspective can help make institutional and evolutionary economics more concrete, relevant, and persuasive, especially regarding policy prescriptions. Such policy actions should strive to improve the antifragility of CIBs and the economic system as a whole, thus enabling individual CIBs and the broader economic system to thrive when faced with macroeconomic shocks. With this in mind, we develop heuristics to evaluate antifragility at the micro, meso, and macro levels before identifying a set of institutional areas where reform can be undertaken to improve antifragility.

The Rise and Decline of Private Foundations as Controlling Owners of Swedish Listed Firms

release date: Jan 01, 2019
The Rise and Decline of Private Foundations as Controlling Owners of Swedish Listed Firms
Private foundations became a vehicle for the corporate control of large listed firms in Sweden during the post-war era, but in the 1990s, they were replaced by wealthy individuals who either directly own controlling blocks or who own them through holding companies. We study potential explanations for this change and propose two taxation-related candidates: shifts in the relative effective taxation across owner types and the dismantling of the inheritance taxation that prevented the generational transfer of the ownership of large controlling blocks. Our analysis exploits newly computed marginal effective capital income tax rates across capital owners, accounting for all relevant factors, including rules governing tax exemptions. We show that the 1990-91 tax reform, abolition of the wealth tax for controlling owners in 1997, 2003 tax exemption of dividends and capital gains on listed stock for holding companies with a voting or equity share of at least 10 percent, and abolition of the inheritance and gift taxes in 2004 reversed the rules of the game. Recently, control has largely been wielded through direct ownership, and the role of foundations is rapidly declining. These findings point to the importance of tax incentives for the use of foundations as the control vehicles of listed firms.
24 results found


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