New Release Books by Mo Ray

Mo Ray is the author of The Evolution of British Gerontology (2020), Family Practices in Later Life (2009) and Understanding the Social Care Crisis in England Through Older People's Lived Experiences (2020).

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The Evolution of British Gerontology

release date: Apr 01, 2020
The Evolution of British Gerontology
This book looks critically at how gerontological knowledge in the UK has developed and changed over the last half century, framed by knowledge of the international gerontological literature and research. Rather than concentrating on reviewing and synthesizing the accumulated body of gerontological research, it looks instead at what can be learned from interviews with people who have been active in building the UK's gerontological knowledge base since the establishment of the British Society of Gerontology (BSG) in 1971, supplemented with a detailed examination of the Society's archives (held at the Centre for Policy on Ageing in London).

Family Practices in Later Life

release date: Sep 02, 2009
Family Practices in Later Life
This exciting book challenges many common stereotypes about the nature of family involvement as people age. The book explores diversity and change in the family relationships older people maintain, looking at how family relationships are constructed and organised in later life.

Understanding the Social Care Crisis in England Through Older People's Lived Experiences

release date: Jan 01, 2020
Understanding the Social Care Crisis in England Through Older People's Lived Experiences
This chapter draws on empirical research that was co-produced with older people about lived experiences of care within the English social care system. Firstly, this chapter offers an overview of the transformations in social care in England. It discusses the implications of neoliberal policy objectives that have driven the changes, primarily individual responsibility and consumer choice, for older people who need care. It then turns to focus on the research we conducted with older people who are paying for their own care and draws on examples from interview data to explore in more depth the disparity between the neoliberal assumptions and actual lived experiences. Finally, we consider what these lived experiences can contribute to understanding the inadequacy of neoliberal thinking in addressing care needs and in democratising care.


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