New Release Books by Suzanne Simard

Suzanne Simard is the author of Finding the Mother Tree (2022), Brushing and Grazing Effects on Lodgepole Pine, Vascular Plants and Range Forage in Three Plant Communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia (1998), Ecology and Management of Paper Birch and Black Cottonwood in Southern British Columbia (1992), Natural Regeneration of Small Patch Cuts in a Southern Interior ICH Forest (2002) and other 4 books.

For more book recommendations, please check out New York Times® Best Sellers, Children's Book Recommendations or the complete list of Featured Book Lists and Award Winners

8 results found

Finding the Mother Tree

release date: Jun 21, 2022
Finding the Mother Tree
NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER - From the world's leading forest ecologist who forever changed how people view trees and their connections to one another and to other living things in the forest--a moving, deeply personal journey of discovery Suzanne Simard is a pioneer on the frontier of plant communication and intelligence; she's been compared to Rachel Carson, hailed as a scientist who conveys complex, technical ideas in a way that is dazzling and profound. Her work has influenced filmmakers (the Tree of Souls of James Cameron's Avatar) and her TED talks have been viewed by more than 10 million people worldwide. Now, in her first book, Simard brings us into her world, the intimate world of the trees, in which she brilliantly illuminates the fascinating and vital truths--that trees are not simply the source of timber or pulp, but are a complicated, interdependent circle of life; that forests are social, cooperative creatures connected through underground networks by which trees communicate their vitality and vulnerabilities with communal lives not that different from our own. Simard writes--in inspiring, illuminating, and accessible ways--how trees, living side by side for hundreds of years, have evolved, how they perceive one another, learn and adapt their behaviors, recognize neighbors, and remember the past; how they have agency about the future; elicit warnings and mount defenses, compete and cooperate with one another with sophistication, characteristics ascribed to human intelligence, traits that are the essence of civil societies--and at the center of it all, the Mother Trees: the mysterious, powerful forces that connect and sustain the others that surround them. Simard writes of her own life, born and raised into a logging world in the rainforests of British Columbia, of her days as a child spent cataloging the trees from the forest and how she came to love and respect them--embarking on a journey of discovery, and struggle. And as she writes of her scientific quest, she writes of her own journey--of love and loss, of observation and change, of risk and reward, making us understand how deeply human scientific inquiry exists beyond data and technology, that it is about understanding who we are and our place in the world, and, in writing of her own life, we come to see the true connectedness of the Mother Tree that nurtures the forest in the profound ways that families and human societies do, and how these inseparable bonds enable all our survival.

Brushing and Grazing Effects on Lodgepole Pine, Vascular Plants and Range Forage in Three Plant Communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia

release date: Jan 01, 1998
Brushing and Grazing Effects on Lodgepole Pine, Vascular Plants and Range Forage in Three Plant Communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia
The Forest Practices Code guidebooks help forest resource managers plan, prescribe and implement sound forest practices that comply with the Forest Practices Code. Together with others such as the Riparian Management Area Guidebook, this document provides managers, planners and field personnel with suitable practices to meet the objectives of Forest Practices Code riparian management objectives.

Ecology and Management of Paper Birch and Black Cottonwood in Southern British Columbia

Ecology and Management of Paper Birch and Black Cottonwood in Southern British Columbia
Hardwoods have long been disposed of to create coniferous forests of high quality. Recently, there have been concerns that this policy is a mistake, not only because the demand for hardwoods is growing but because of the negative aspects of growing coniferous monocultures. This analysis examined hardwood inventory, ecology, management, and use issues through a summary of hardwood inventory in the Kamloops Forest Region, a field assessment of management practices and stand conditions in two subzones in the region, and a review of literature related to paper birch and black cottonwood, the predominant species in the productive subzones. The field assessment consisted of the sampling of regeneration stands younger than 20 years to identify management practices that were successful for hardwood, conifer, or mixedwood production. Immature-mature stands older than 20 years were sampled across a range of ecosystems to assess their stand structure, species composition, and growth and yield.

Natural Regeneration of Small Patch Cuts in a Southern Interior ICH Forest

release date: Jan 01, 2002
Natural Regeneration of Small Patch Cuts in a Southern Interior ICH Forest
Almost all harvested sites in the interior cedar hemlock (ICH) zone of British Columbia are currently planted, but natural regeneration can be a viable reforestation alternative in small patch cuts or where a partial canopy is retained. This report describes a project in which five small, variable-sized patch cuts in an ICH forest were studied to determine the effects of opening size, edge characteristics, and substrate quality on the distribution & composition of natural regeneration. Results are presented & discussed regarding regeneration at four years after harvest.

Effects of Operational Brushing on Conifers and Plant Communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia

PROBE

release date: Jan 01, 1993
PROBE
This land management handbook presents a design protocol that defines minimum standards for an objective, low intensity monitoring system called PROBE. PROBE's purpose is to provide a monitoring framework for use in a wide array of vegetation complexes, ecosystems, and operational vegetation management treatments. The framework standardizes installation location, response measurements and statistical analyses. This method satisfies the basic objective of most operational brushing evaluations, which is to determine the effects of vegetation management treatments on the survival and growth of crop trees, and on the abundance of target non-crop species. The condition of wildlife habitat can be monitored within the PROBE framework and site preparation treatments can also be monitored using PROBE.

Effects of Pre-commercial Thinning on Growth and Diversity of Paper Birch Leading Stands 25 Years Following Thinning

release date: Jan 01, 2020

Nine-year Response of Lodgepole Pine and the Dry Alder Complex to Chemical and Manual Release Treatments on an ICHmk1 Site Near Kelowna

8 results found


  • Aboutread.com makes it one-click away to discover great books from local library by linking books/movies to your library catalog search.

  • Copyright © 2022 Aboutread.com