New Release Books by Terry Smyth

Terry Smyth is the author of Captive Fathers, Captive Children (2023), Napoleon's Australia (2018), Australian Desperadoes (2017), Denny Day (2016) and other 3 books.

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Captive Fathers, Captive Children

release date: May 04, 2023
Captive Fathers, Captive Children
Why are the daughters and sons of Far East prisoners of war still captivated by the stories of their fathers? What is it that compels so many of the children, after so many years, to search for the details of their fathers' captivity? And how, over the decades, have they come to terms with their childhood memories? In his book Terry Smyth treads new ground by examining the processes through which the children's memory practices came to be rooted in the POW experiences of their fathers. By following a life course approach, the book will address how memory and trauma were 'worked into' the social and cultural lives of individual children, and will explore how the relationship between their inner psychic worlds and subsequent memory practices unfolded against a challenging historical geopolitical background that was shot through with moral ambivalence. Through these means, the book invites readers to engage with the author in a journey of exploration and self-reflection, with elements of auto-ethnography adding richness to the text. The result it is a valuable revival of current literature. Enlivened by interview extracts, case study material and ethnographic observations that will blend the theoretical and the empirical, this work is a valuable revival of current literature.

Napoleon's Australia

release date: Aug 20, 2018
Napoleon's Australia
'A fascinating insight into French ambition and amity in Australia, bursting with joie de vivre' - David Hunt, bestselling author of Girt In the northern winter of 1814, a French armada set sail for New South Wales. The armada's mission was the invasion of Sydney, and its inspiration and its fate were interwoven with one of history's greatest love stories - that of Napoleon and Josephine. The Empress Josephine was fascinated by all things Australian. In the gardens of her grand estate, Malmaison, she kept kangaroos, emus, black swans and other Australian animals, along with hundreds of native plants brought back by French explorers in peacetime. And even when war raged between France and Britain, ships known to be carrying Australian flora and fauna for 'Josephine's Ark' were given safe passage. Napoleon, too, had an abiding interest in Australia, but for quite different reasons. What Britain and its Australian colonies did not know was that French explorers visiting these shores, purporting to be naturalists on scientific expeditions, were in fact spies, gathering vital information on the colony's defences. It was ripe for the picking. The conquest of Australia was on Bonaparte's agenda for world domination, and detailed plans had been made for the invasion, and for how French Australia would be governed. How it all came together and how it fell apart is a remarkable tale - history with an element of the 'What if?' No less remarkable is how the tempestuous relationship between Napoleon and his empress affected the fate of the Great Southern Land.

Australian Desperadoes

release date: Jul 03, 2017
Australian Desperadoes
The Coves - San Francisco's first organised-crime gang - were Australians: men and women with criminal careers in Australia who had come to the US, mostly illegally, during the gold rush. The Coves had come not to dig for gold but to unleash a crime wave the likes of which America had never seen. Robbery, murder, arson and extortion were the Coves' stock-in-trade, and it was said that the leader of the gang, Jim Stewart, had killed more men than any man in California. The gang's base, in the waterfront district, came to be known as Sydney Town. The area was a no-go zone for police - many of whom were in Stewart's pocket anyway - so, just as Capone would one day rule Chicago, the Coves ruled San Francisco. And more than once, just to make sure there was no doubt that Frisco was their town, they burnt it down. The Coves were hated and feared by the respectable citizens of San Francisco - who derisively called them 'Sydney Ducks' but never to their faces - and, realising that the forces of the law could not, or would not, take them on, decided lynch law was the only solution, and formed a vigilante group. The streets of San Francisco became a battlefield as the Coves and the vigilantes fought for control of the city, with gunfights and lynchings almost daily spectacles as the police stood idly by. Jim Stewart was arrested in Sacramento for killing a sheriff, but escaped to be involved in one the most celebrated cases of mistaken identity in the annals of American crime. When the smoke cleared, the Coves' reign of terror was over. Some were strung up from storefronts in the street, some fell in a deadly gunfight with Jonathan R. Davis, one of the fastest guns in the west, others escaped capture and returned to Australia. The story of the Sydney Coves is little-known, fascinating and well worth telling.

Denny Day

release date: Jun 01, 2016
Denny Day
Captain Edward Denny Day - the only law 'from the Big River to the sea' - was Australia's greatest lawman, yet few have heard of him. This is his story. Once there was a wilderness- Australia's frontier, a dangerous and unforgiving place where outlaws ruled the roads and killers were hailed as heroes. It was here, in 1838, that one man's uncompromising sense of justice changed history and shocked the world. Denny Day was a vicar's son from Ireland. A member of the Anglo-Irish ruling class, as a young man Day joined the British Army before resigning to seek his fortune in New South Wales. There he accepted the most challenging role in the young colony- keeping the peace on the frontier. Denny Day's abiding legacy is the capture of the perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre - the most infamous mass-murder in Australian history, and the first time white men were convicted of the murder of Aborigines. Yet Day won no praise for bringing to justice the killers of 28 innocent men, women and children at Myall Creek. Rather, he was scorned and shunned, fiercely attacked by the press, by powerful landowners who hired the colony's top lawyers to defend the killers, and by the general public. The 11 men tracked down and arrested by Day faced two sensational trials, and seven of them were eventually found guilty of murder and hanged. The case sparked an international outcry, resulting in stricter government policies protecting the rights of Indigenous peoples. There are many colourful characters, heroes and villains, in Denny Day's story- inspirational frontier women; outlaws captured in a desperate firefight; brave and wily Aboriginal resistance leaders; gormless colonial officials; privileged English nobles and persecuted Irish immigrants; convicts and freemen; and, for good measure, an American pirate. Denny Day was commended for bravery during his lifetime, but only in regards to taming the frontier settlements. Even in his obituary, Myall Creek is not mentioned.

Australian Confederates

release date: Aug 03, 2015
Australian Confederates
IN the summer of 1865, when a Confederate warship sailed into the port of Melbourne, 42 men secretly enlisted to fight for the South in the American Civil War. On the notorious raider Shenandoah – scourge of the Yankee merchant fleet – they sailed off to adventure and controversy, and fired the last shot of the war. When the Shenandoah - a sleek steamer/sailer and one of the fastest ships afloat - dropped anchor in Hobsons Bay, the fledgling colony of Victoria was taken by surprise, and the Confederates had no way of knowing whether they would be hailed as heroes or hanged as pirates. To the rebels’ surprise, Melbourne took them to its heart. Victorians came in their thousands to visit the ship, and its officers were feted as celebrities. They were wined and dined by the city’s elite, attended a ball held in their honour , mixed it with Yankee sympathisers in a barroom brawl, and charmed the ladies of Melbourne and Ballarat with their grand Southern manners. Meanwhile, in defiance of the law against foreign warships recruiting in a neutral port, 42 men were smuggled aboard in dead of night and, once at sea, signed up to join the Confederate Navy. For Australia – not yet a nation – 1865 was a watershed year in an age of gold rushes, bushrangers, disputes between rival colonies, and fears of foreign invasion. For war-torn America, it was the turning point in the deadliest conflict in that nation’s history. After the defeat at Gettysburg, the tide had turned against the Confederacy but the South was determined to fight on, and, in the war at sea, the Shenandoah was the last best hope. The Shenandoah’s mission was to damage the North’s economy by attacking its commercial fleet, and, under the command of the enigmatic Captain James Waddell, the raider went on to wipe out almost the entire New England whaling fleet. On learning that Robert E. Lee had surrendered, Waddell refused to believe the cause was lost. The Shenandoah continued harrying the Yankee fleet and fired the last shot of the war after capturing, burning and ransoming 38 Union ships and taking more than 1,000 prisoners. On accepting at last that the war had ended, the Confederates sailed around the world to England, pursued as pirates by Union warships, and surrendered to the neutral British. Some 120 Australians are known to have fought in the American Civil War, on both sides. Looking back, it is an uncomfortable thought that Australians could sympathise with a society based on the obscenity of slavery, yet while officialdom in the colonies backed the Union and British neutrality, public opinion generally favoured the South. The gold rush era, during which the Shenandoah arrived, tended to glorify rebel causes, and the Southerners had no difficulty finding willing recruits. Of the 42 men who signed on in Melbourne as petty officers, seamen and marines, some returned home, others dropped out of sight and one died aboard ship – the last man to die in the service of the Confederacy. This is their story.

Caring for Older People

release date: Jan 01, 1996
Caring for Older People
Caring for Older People has been specially adapted for Australia, and offers a systematic and imaginative approach to care planning based on the authors' belief in the positive aspects of old age. Care of the whole person is discussed in detail: physical, psychological, social, educational and spiritual needs are all covered. The need for care workers to have an awareness of the values of a multicultural society is stressed throughout. Care workers are encouraged to question what is involved in the caring process and to reflect on its impact on their own lives. The work-based activities develop the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective care worker. Information is presented clearly and simply throughout, making Caring for Older People an invaluable book for those training in the care sector or caring for an older person in their home.

101 Benefits of Baldness

release date: Jan 01, 1995
101 Benefits of Baldness
A fun book written by a couple of egg heads who firmly believe if you have it: Flaunt It. 101 Benefits of Baldness uncovers (pardon the pun) the Bald Society which includes notables such as: Telly Savalas, 007 sexy man Sean Connery and Patrick Stewart, Captain of the Starship Enterprise who hasBaldly gone where no man has gone before!And for you hairy ones who may snicker at a smooth cranium take heed:The Lord made millions of headsAnd those he didn't like He covered up!A new generation of music superstars: Phil Collins, Peter Garrett, Mark Knofpler, all know that Bald is In.They cause heartache to female fans and headaches to lighting technicians. But don't be mislead; this is no New Age Fad. Socrates, Buddha, Francis Bacon, Gandhi, and Winston Churchill were all aware of the 101 Benefits of Baldness.
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