New Release Books by William James Cobb

William James Cobb is the author of The Bird Saviors (2012), Goodnight, Texas (2006), The White Tattoo (2002) and The Clinical Textbook of Prison Based Medical Research in Mood Disorders (2017).

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The Bird Saviors

release date: Jan 01, 2012
The Bird Saviors
Ruby Cole decides to abandon her baby rather than marry a man twice her age who already has two wives and sets off a series of reactions that involve an equestrian police officer, pawnshop clientele and a grieving ornithologist.

Goodnight, Texas

release date: Jan 01, 2006
Goodnight, Texas
In Goodnight, Texas, people struggle to survive job loss, severe over-fishing, and a looming hurricane. A lyrical, romantic, comic, and redemptive story about wanting what you cannot have, love amidst the ruins, survival, connection, and hope. In Goodnight, Texas, people struggle to survive job loss, severe over-fishing, and a looming hurricane. A lyrical, romantic, comic, and redemptive story about wanting what you cannot have, love amidst the ruins, survival, connection, and hope.

The White Tattoo

release date: Jan 01, 2002
The White Tattoo
The White Tattoo is a smart, always surprising collection of American stories. William J. Cobb knows and loves his character and places. His first collection of short stories, The White Tattoo, revels in the undeniable allure of the physical world even as it is juxtaposed with the twists and kinks of psychological and emotional pain. At one extreme is the tense, torturous psychology of "Motel Ice," whose narrative voice emerges from the mind of a mentally disturbed Jehovah's Witness gazing out on a world of temptation and redemption. Similarly hyperdramatic in its conclusion and its arc of betrayal and violent aftermath, "For All You Dorks, Blah Blah Blah" conjures up a sleepwalking, murderous father who is less culpable in the harm he causes but all the while most destructive. Stylistically, the stories crackle, snap, and zing. Several of them, including "The Wishes," "The Atmosphere of Vienna," and "Dark Matter," use an idiosyncratic, Tilt-O-Whirl narrative marked by a swirling, shifting focus and point of view, trying to create a multifaceted, complex vision of the world by dipping in and out of the consciousness of various characters.

The Clinical Textbook of Prison Based Medical Research in Mood Disorders

release date: May 23, 2017
The Clinical Textbook of Prison Based Medical Research in Mood Disorders
In our modern society with a large population of young men being incarcerated, are we as healthcare professionals providing and indeed considering the most appropriate forms of mental health therapy. This book asks the questions, what are the merits of cognitive behavioural therapy and electronic CBT or (CBT/ECBT) in comparison to drug therapy or pharmacotherapy in the treatment of adult prisoners, and how indeed as clinicians are we implementing this into practice and how can research methodologies be devised to best fit the model of treatment of the mentally ill within the prison setting. Patients that are incarcerated are at increased risk of depression and only one in 10 prisoners have no form of mental distress (mental health foundation.) Leahy (2006) suggests that even a brief intervention of 4 to 6-week sessions of 10 to 60 minutes of interventional CBT can have effective results of improving mood and further improve drug treatment withdrawal further down the line. Nathan and Gorman (2007) speculates that CBT appears to be more widely accepted by patients than medication treatment alone and that dropout rates for patients are less in CBT than that of pharmacotherapy treatments. Adult nurses more so than doctors in a prison environment will, without the doubt, come into contact with patients who suffer from some form of mental distress on a daily basis, be this from the environment or from external factors. It has been questioned in some literature if nurses simply medicate rather than engage in other forms of therapy, such as CBT or ECBT.Stein and Wilkinson (2007) suggest that in certain circumstances, it may be hard to obtain psychological support for patients, be this due to the nature of the environment or the training of the staff. Staff levels and workload are also variables that may result in deterioration of services provided, thus resulting in drug therapy being the easiest and possibly cheapest alternative.
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