New Release Books by William Marling

William Marling is the author of Christian Anarchist (2022), Gatekeepers (2016), How "American" Is Globalization? (2006), The American Roman Noir (1998) and other 5 books.

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9 results found

Christian Anarchist

release date: Feb 15, 2022
Christian Anarchist
"This is the first biography of Ammon Hennacy, the famous "Christian Anarchist" and colleague of Dorothy Day, whose politics of voluntary poverty and ecological conscience pre-figure today's social justice, ecology, and gender equality movements. Hennacy is a fascinating figure in that evolution; he spent time in prison with Alexander Berkman, lived with the Hopis, romanced Dorothy Day, and started the Joe Hill House of Hospitality in Utah. He also explored social libertarianism with Henry Nunn, the founder of Nunn-Bush Shoes. Not only a fascinating biography, this book is a nuanced study of "unruly equality," as Andrew Cornell calls it, where religion and anarchist theory overlap. Today these forces are rippling through Seattle, Los Angeles, Copenhagen and other world cities, as anarchists try to set up their own social systems"--

Gatekeepers

release date: Mar 15, 2016
Gatekeepers
The romantic idea of the writer as an isolated genius has been discredited, but there are few empirical studies documenting the role of "gatekeeping" in the literary process. How do friends, agents, editors, translators, small publishers, and reviewers-not to mention the changes in technology and the publishing industry-shape the literary process? This matrix is further complicated when books cross cultural and language barriers, that is, when they become part of world literature. Gatekeepers builds on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Randall Collins, James English, and Mark McGurl, describing the multi-layered gatekeeping process in the context of World Literature after the 1960s. It focuses on four case studies: Gabriel García Márquez, Charles Bukowski, Paul Auster and Haruki Murakami. The two American authors achieved remarkable success overseas owing to canny gatekeepers; the two international authors benefited tremendously from well-curated translation into English. Rich in archival materials (correspondence between authors, editors, and translators, and publishing industry analyses), interviews with publishers and translators, and close readings of translations, this study shows how the process and production of literature depends on the larger social forces of a given historical moment. William Marling also documents the ever-increasing Anglo-centric dictate on the gatekeeping process. World literature, the book argues, is not so much a "republic of letters" as a field of chance on which the conversation is partly bracketed by historic events and technological opportunities.

How "American" Is Globalization?

release date: Jun 12, 2006

The American Roman Noir

release date: Oct 01, 1998
The American Roman Noir
In The American Roman Noir, William Marling reads classic hard-boiled fiction and film in the contexts of narrative theories and American social and cultural history. His search for the origins of the dark narratives that emerged during the 1920s and 1930s leads to a sweeping critique of Jazz-Age and Depression-era culture. Integrating economic history, biography, consumer product design, narrative analysis, and film scholarship, Marling makes new connections between events of the 1920s and 1930s and the modes, styles, and genres of their representation. At the center of Marling's approach is the concept of "prodigality": how narrative represents having, and having had, too much. Never before in the country, he argues, did wealth impinge on the national conscience as in the 1920s, and never was such conscience so sharply rebuked as in the 1930s. What, asks Marling, were the paradigms that explained accumulation and windfall, waste and failure? Marling first establishes a theoretical and historical context for the notion of prodigality. Among the topics he discusses are such watershed events as the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti and the premiere of the first sound movie, The Jazz Singer; technology's alteration of Americans' perceptive and figurative habits; and the shift from synecdochical to metonymical values entailed by a consumer society. Marling then considers six noir classics, relating them to their authors' own lives and to the milieu of prodigality that produced them and which they sought to explain: Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest and The Maltese Falcon, James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity, and Raymond Chandler's The Big Sleep and Farewell My Lovely. Reading these narratives first as novels, then as films, Marling shows how they employed the prodigality fabula's variations and ancillary value systems to help Americans adapt--for better or worse--to a society driven by economic and technological forces beyond their control.

Killers in Tutus

release date: Oct 31, 2017
Killers in Tutus
Exquisite book of photos and art interleaved with prose and poems that interrogate them. Subjects include Lebanon, France, Germany, Estonia, Ohio, New York City, Utah, and many well-known writers.

Raymond Chandler

release date: Jan 01, 1986
Raymond Chandler
A critical study tracing the relationship between style and era for each of Chandler's seven full-length books.

William Carlos Williams and the Painters, 1909-1923

Williams and the Arensberg Circle, 1909-1923

9 results found


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