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Literary Translation

release date: Aug 29, 2014
Literary Translation
Literary Translation: Redrawing the Boundaries is a collection of articles that gathers together current work in literary translation to show how research in the field can speak to other disciplines such as cultural studies, history, linguistics, literary studies and philosophy, whilst simultaneously learning from them.

All for Nothing

release date: Aug 29, 2014
All for Nothing
A specter is haunting philosophy -- the specter of Hamlet. Why is this? Wherefore? What should we do?Entering from stage left: the philosopher''s Hamlet. The philosopher''s Hamlet is a conceptual character, played by philosophers rather than actors. He performs not in the theater but within the space of philosophical positions. In All for Nothing, Andrew Cutrofello critically examines the performance history of this unique role. The philosopher''s Hamlet personifies negativity. In Shakespeare''s play, Hamlet''s speech and action are characteristically negative; he is the melancholy Dane. Most would agree that he has nothing to be cheerful about. Philosophers have taken Hamlet to embody specific forms of negativity that first came into view in modernity. What the figure of the Sophist represented for Plato, Hamlet has represented for modern philosophers. Cutrofello analyzes five aspects of Hamlet''s negativity: his melancholy, negative faith, nihilism, tarrying (which Cutrofello distinguishes from "delaying"), and nonexistence. Along the way, we meet Hamlet in the texts of Kant, Coleridge, Hegel, Marx, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Freud, Russell, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Benjamin, Arendt, Schmitt, Lacan, Deleuze, Foucault, Derrida, Badiou, Žižek, and other philosophers. Whirling across a kingdom of infinite space, the philosopher''s Hamlet is nothing if not thought-provoking.

The Digital Afterlives of Jane Austen

release date: Mar 18, 2014
The Digital Afterlives of Jane Austen
This is the first scholarly study to explore the ever-expanding world of online Austen fandom and fan fiction writing. Using case studies from the Internet writing community and publisher, Wattpad, as well as dedicated fan websites, it illuminates the literary processes and products that have given Austen multiple afterlives in the digital arena.

The Trickster Figure in American Literature

release date: Oct 23, 2013
The Trickster Figure in American Literature
This book analyzes and offers fresh insights into the trickster tradition including African American, American Indian, Euro-American, Asian American, and Latino/a stories, Morgan examines the oral roots of each racial/ethnic group to reveal how each group''s history, frustrations, and aspirations have molded the tradition in contemporary literature.

The Gothic Child

release date: Oct 17, 2013
The Gothic Child
Fascination with the dark and death threats are now accepted features of contemporary fantasy and fantastic fictions for young readers. These go back to the early gothic genre in which child characters were extensively used by authors. The aim of this book is to rediscover the children in their work.

The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

release date: Sep 26, 2013
The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary British and Irish Poetry
This title offers an authoritative and up-to-date collection of original essays bringing together ground breaking research into the development of contemporary poetry in Britain and Ireland.

Metapoetry in Euripides

release date: Jan 31, 2013
Metapoetry in Euripides
A detailed study of the self-conscious narrative devices within Euripidean drama and how these are interwoven with issues of thematic importance, social, theological, or political. Torrance argues that Euripides employed a complex system of metapoetic strategies in order to draw the audience''s attention to the novelty of his compositions.

Temporalities

release date: Jan 01, 2013
Temporalities
Temporalities presents a concise critical introduction to the treatment of time throughout literature. Time and its passage represent one of the oldest and most complex philosophical subjects in art of all forms, and Russell West-Pavlov explains and interrogates the most important theories of temporality across a range of disciplines. The author explores temporality''s relationship with a diverse range of related concepts, including: historiography psychology gender economics postmodernism postcolonialism Russell West-Pavlov examines time as a crucial part of the critical theories of Newton, Freud, Ricoeur, Benjamin, and explores the treatment of time in a broad range of texts, ranging from the writings of St. Augustine and Sterne''s Tristram Shandy, to Woolf''s Mrs Dalloway and Stoppard''s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. This comprehensive and accessible guide establishes temporality as an essential theme within literary and cultural studies today.

Eco-critical Literature

release date: Jan 01, 2013
Eco-critical Literature
Eco-Critical Literature: Regreening African Landscapescritically examines the representations, constructions, and imaginings of the relationship between the human and non-human worlds in contemporary African literature and culture. It offers innovative, incisive, and critical perspectives on the importance of sustaining a symbiotic relationship between humans and their environment. The book thus carries African scholarship beyond the mere analysis of themes and style to ethical and activist roles of literature having an impact on readers and the public. It is a scholarship geared towards rectifying ecological imbalance that is prevalent in many parts of the continent that forms the setting, context, and thematic discourse of the works or authors studied in this book. Besides sensitizing the African readership to the need for the restoration of harmony between man and the environment, this book equally aims to further familiarize scholars and students working on African literature and culture with the theoretical concerns of eco-criticism.

The Demonic

release date: Jan 01, 2013
The Demonic
Are we either good or bad, and do we really know the difference? Why do we want what we cannot have, and even to be what we''re not? Can we desire others without wanting to possess them? Can we open to others and not risk possession ourselves? And where, in these cases, do we draw the line? Ewan Fernie argues that the demonic tradition in literature offers a key to our most agonised and intimate experiences. The Demonic ranges across the breadth of Western culture, engaging with writers as central and various as Luther, Shakespeare, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Melville and Mann. A powerful foreword by Jonathan Dollimore brings out its implications as an intellectual and stylistic breakthrough into new ways of writing criticism. Fernie unfolds an intense and personal vision, not just of Western modernity, but of identity, morality and sex. As much as it''s concerned with the great works, this is a book about life.

World Literature

release date: Nov 01, 2012
World Literature
A remarkable exploration of the best in written works from around the world is at the heart of an amazing new literature series from respected educator and author, Dr. James Stobaugh. Contains concept building exercises for warm-up, suggested reading lists and schedules, writing activities for enrichment, biblical applications and special project and critical thinking exercises. Comprehensive and complete to allow for a year''s worth of study. Structured to standalone or be integrated into a comprehensive curriculum, designed to present a strong sample of literature to help the Christian student from a strong and biblical worldview.

Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society

release date: Oct 02, 2012
Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society
TOGETHER THEY FOUND THE ONE THING THAT ELUDED THEM AS INDIVIDUALS: A PLACE IN THE WORLD.

Psychology for Language Learning

release date: Jul 24, 2012
Psychology for Language Learning
Offering a timely snapshot of current theory and research in the field of psychology in foreign language learning, this book is accessible to both specialists and non-specialists. Each chapter focuses on a different psychological construct and provides an overview of current thinking in the area drawing on insights from educational psychology.

Speaking of Monsters

release date: Jul 16, 2012
Speaking of Monsters
Employing a range of approaches to examine how "monster-talk" pervades not only popular culture but also public policy through film and other media, this book is a "one-stop shop" of sorts for students and instructors employing various approaches and media in the study of "teratologies," or discourses of the monstrous.

Domestication and Foreignization in Translation Studies

release date: Jun 01, 2012
Domestication and Foreignization in Translation Studies
Papers from a conference held Septemeber 29-October 1, 2011 in Joensuu, Finland.

The Event of Literature

release date: May 29, 2012
The Event of Literature
Offers a thorough examination of the philosophy of literature, looking at the place of literature in human culture, what literature can be defined as and much more.

Theory of Literature

release date: Apr 24, 2012
Theory of Literature
Bringing his perennially popular course to the page, Yale University Professor Paul H. Fry offers in this welcome book a guided tour of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. At the core of the book''s discussion is a series of underlying questions: What is literature, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose? Fry engages with the major themes and strands in twentieth-century literary theory, among them the hermeneutic circle, New Criticism, structuralism, linguistics and literature, Freud and fiction, Jacques Lacan''s theories, the postmodern psyche, the political unconscious, New Historicism, the classical feminist tradition, African American criticism, queer theory, and gender performativity. By incorporating philosophical and social perspectives to connect these many trends, the author offers readers a coherent overall context for a deeper and richer reading of literature.

Bookless in Baghdad

release date: Apr 01, 2012
Bookless in Baghdad
“This amalgam of essay, literary criticism, and memoir blends into a tribute to the world of books.” —Chicago Tribune

Borges and Plato

release date: Jan 01, 2012
Borges and Plato
This comparative approach shows how the Platonic viewpoint sheds new light on Borges'' essayistic and fictional work. Analyses to which extent his thought is deeply rooted in classical philosophical doctrines.

The Other East and Nineteenth-Century British Literature

release date: Nov 30, 2011
The Other East and Nineteenth-Century British Literature
The Polish exile and the Russian villain were familiar figures in nineteenth-century British culture. This book restores the significance of Eastern Europe to nineteenth-century British literature, offering new readings of Blake''s Europe , Byron''s Mazeppa , and Eliot''s Middlemarch , and recovering influential works by Thomas Campbell and Jane Porter.

Girl Who Never Made Mistakes

release date: Oct 01, 2011
Girl Who Never Made Mistakes
Beatrice is so well-known for never making a mistake that she is greeted each morning by fans and reporters, but a near-error on the day of the school talent show could change everything.

Tradition, Translation, Trauma

release date: Jun 30, 2011
Tradition, Translation, Trauma
A collection of essays by a team of distinguished international contributors concerned with how Classic - mainly Greek and Latin but also Arabic and Portuguese - texts become present in later cultures; how they are passed on, received and affect over time and space, and how they resonate in the modern.

"Wide Sargasso Sea" by Jean Rhys as a Postcolonial Response to "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte

release date: May 01, 2011
"Wide Sargasso Sea" by Jean Rhys as a Postcolonial Response to "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte
Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,00, University of Koblenz-Landau (Anglistik), course: Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures, language: English, abstract: Wide Sargasso Sea is one of the best-known literary postcolonial replies to the writing of Charlotte Bronte and a brilliant deconstruction of what is known as the author''s "worlding" in Jane Eyre. The novel written by Jean Rhys tells the story of Jane Eyre''s protagonist, Edward Rochester. The plot takes place in West Indies where Rochester met his first wife, Bertha Antoinette Mason. Wide Sargasso Sea influences the common reading and understanding of the matrix novel, as it rewrites crucial parts of Jane Eyre. The heroine in Jean Rhys''s Wide Sargasso Sea, Antoinette Cosway, is created out of demonic and bestialic Bertha Mason from Jane Eyre. Rhys''s great achievement in her re-writing of the Bronte''s text is her creation of a double to the madwoman from Jane Eyre. The heroine of Wide Sargasso Sea, the beautiful Antoinette Cosway, heiress of the post-emancipation fortune is created out of the demonc and bestialic Bertha Mason. The author transforms the first Mrs Rochester into an individual figure whose madness is caused by imperialistic and patriarchal oppression The vision of Bertha/Antoinette as an insane offspring from a family plagued by madness is no longer plausible to the reader. In this essay I would like to focus the factors which led to the madness of the protagonist. Although Bertha Mason and Jane Eyre seem to be enemies and contradictory characters in the Victorian novel, many critics find several similarities between the two heroines, their life and finally between Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea. Seeing Jane Eyre and Antoinette Cosway as sisters and doubles is very popular with some critics who dealt with the works of Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys. Nevertheless, I would like to focus in this essay on Gayatri Chakravort

Between Ecstasy and Truth

release date: Jan 01, 2011
Between Ecstasy and Truth
As well as producing one of the finest of all poetic traditions, ancient Greek culture produced a major tradition of poetic theory and criticism. Halliwell''s volume offers a series of detailed and challenging interpretations of some of the defining authors and texts in the history of ancient Greek poetics: the Homeric epics, Aristophanes'' Frogs, Plato''s Republic, Aristotle''s Poetics, Gorgias''s Helen, Isocrates'' treatises, Philodemus'' On Poems, and Longinus On the Sublime. The volume''s fundamental concern is with how the Greeks conceptualized the experience of poetry and debated the values of that experience. The book''s organizing theme is a recurrent Greek dialectic between ideas of poetry as, on the one hand, a powerfully enthralling experience in its own right (a kind of ''ecstasy'') and, on the other, a medium for the expression of truths which can exercise lasting influence on its audiences'' views of the world. Citing a wide range of modern scholarship, and making frequent connections with later periods of literary theory and aesthetics, Halliwell questions many orthodoxies and received opinions about the texts analysed. The resulting perspective casts new light on ways in which the Greeks attempted to make sense of the psychology of poetic experience - including the roles of emotion, ethics, imagination, and knowledge - in the life of their culture.

Victorian Jewelry, Identity, and the Novel

release date: Jan 01, 2011
Victorian Jewelry, Identity, and the Novel
Jean Arnold explores the role material objects play in the cultural cohesion of the West, arguing that gems symbolized the most closely held beliefs of the Victorians and thus can be considered "prisms of culture." Her close readings of works by Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Anthony Trollope show jewels turned into symbols of power, personal relationships, and valued ideas that serve to bind the materialist culture together.

Madness in Post-1945 British and American Fiction

release date: Oct 14, 2010
Madness in Post-1945 British and American Fiction
A comprehensive and thematic exploration of representations of madness in postwar British and American Fiction, this book is relevant to those with interests in literary studies and is a vital read for psychiatric clinicians and professionals who are interested in how literature can inform and enhance clinical practices.

Fateful Beauty

release date: May 23, 2010
Fateful Beauty
When Oscar Wilde said he had "seen wallpaper which must lead a boy brought up under its influence to a life of crime," his joke played on an idea that has often been taken quite seriously--both in Wilde''s day and in our own. In Fateful Beauty, Douglas Mao recovers the lost intellectual, social, and literary history of the belief that the beauty--or ugliness--of the environment in which one is raised influences or even determines one''s fate. Weaving together readings in literature, psychology, biology, philosophy, education, child-rearing advice, and interior design, he shows how this idea abetted a dramatic rise in attention to environment in many discourses and in many practices affecting the lives of the young between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth. Through original and detailed analyses of Wilde, Walter Pater, James Joyce, Theodore Dreiser, Rebecca West, and W. H. Auden, Mao shows that English-language writing of the period was informed in crucial but previously unrecognized ways by the possibility that beautiful environments might produce better people. He also reveals how these writers shared concerns about environment, evolution, determinism, freedom, and beauty with scientists and social theorists such as Herbert Spencer, Hermann von Helmholtz, Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, and W.H.R. Rivers. In so doing, Mao challenges conventional views of the roles of beauty and the aesthetic in art and life during this time.

Tenses of Imagination

release date: Jan 01, 2010
Tenses of Imagination
Raymond Williams was an enormously influential figure in late twentieth-century intellectual life as a novelist, playwright and critic, "the British Sartre," as The Times put it. He was a central inspiration for the early British New Left and a close intellectual supporter of Plaid Cymru. He is widely acknowledged as one of the "founding fathers" of cultural studies, who established "cultural materialism" as a new paradigm for work in both literary and cultural studies. There is a substantial secondary literature on Williams, which treats his life and work in each of these respects. But none of it makes much of his enduring contribution to utopian studies and science fiction studies. This volume brings together a complete collection of Williams''s critical essays on science fiction and futurology, Utopia, and dystopia, in literature, film, television, and politics, and with extracts from his two future novels, The Volunteers (1978) and The Fight for Manod (1979). Both the collection as a whole and the individual readings are accompanied by introductory essays written by Andrew Milner. "With the twenty-first-century reader very much in mind, Andrew Milner''s selection of texts offers a new, `alternative'' Raymond Williams - the critic and occasional author of science fiction, the futurologist, the wary, self-questioning Utopian thinker for whom intellectual pessimism is a lazy response and never the last word." Professor Patrick Parrinder, University of Reading "The future was the ultimate stake in all Raymond Williams''s thinking and writing, as Andrew Milner simply and powerfully shows us now, by assembling a volume of writings on science fiction and utopianism that turns out to be a very substantial, wide-ranging reader in Williams''s work as a whole. The defining importance of `the sense of the future,'' as he called it, the future as the essential discipline of political and moral imagination, is the lesson of this very welcome collection." Professor Francis Mulhern, Middlesex University

Essays on Literature, History & Society

release date: Jan 01, 2010
Essays on Literature, History & Society
In a consideration of a vast scope of themes such as ghazal as a form of non-conformist poetry, Hispano-Arabic connections with English poetry, Syed Ahmad Khan''s role in the Urdu-Hindi controversy, and madrasa education and its contemporary criticism, the volume forms an important compliment (and corrective) to much of the current writings on the various issues.

ABC of Reading

release date: Jan 01, 2010
ABC of Reading
In celebration of what would have been Ezra Pound''s 125th birthday comes a new edition of the author''s classic book about the meaning of literature, now with a new introduction. Reissue.

The Mulatta and the Politics of Race

release date: Jan 01, 2010
The Mulatta and the Politics of Race
From abolition through the years just before the civil rights struggle began, African American women recognized that a mixed-race woman made for a powerful and, at times, very useful figure in the battle for racial justice.The Mulatta and the Politics of Race traces many key instances in which black women have wielded the image of a racially mixed woman to assault the color line. In the oratory and fiction of black women from the late 1840s through the 1950s, Teresa C. Zackodnik finds the mulatta to be a metaphor of increasing potency. Before the Civil War white female abolitionists created the image of the "tragic mulatta," caught between races, rejected by all. African American women put the mulatta to diverse political use. Black women used the mulatta figure to invoke and manage American and British abolitionist empathy and to contest racial stereotypes of womanhood in the postbellum United States. The mulatta aided writers in critiquing the "New Negro Renaissance" and gave writers leverage to subvert the aims of mid-twentieth-century mainstream American culture.The Mulatta and the Politics of Race focuses on the antislavery lectures and appearances of Ellen Craft and Sarah Parker Remond, the domestic fiction of Pauline Hopkins and Frances Harper, the Harlem Renaissance novels of Jessie Fauset and Nella Larsen, and the little-known 1950s texts of Dorothy Lee Dickens and Reba Lee. Throughout, the author discovers the especially valuable and as yet unexplored contributions of these black women and their uses of the mulatta in prose and speech.Teresa C. Zackodnik is a professor of English at the University of Alberta in Canada.

Mourning Happiness

release date: Jan 01, 2010
Mourning Happiness
A work of rare scope and power that grapples with the big questions: Is happiness the proper end of life, as the Greeks conceived it to be, or is life, as it appears since the early English novel, an endless trial?--Adam Potkay

Rites of Passage in Postcolonial Women's Writing

release date: Jan 01, 2010
Rites of Passage in Postcolonial Women's Writing
This volume brings a variety of new approaches and contexts to modem and contemporary women''s writing. Contributors include both new and well-established scholars from Europe, Australia, the USA , and the Caribbean. Their essays draw on, adapt, and challenge anthropological perspectives on rites of passage derived from the work of Arnold van Gennep and Victor Turner. Collectively, the essays suggest that women''s writing and women''s experiences from diverse cultures go beyond any straightforward notion of a threefold structure of separation, transition, and incorporation. Some essays include discussion of traditional rites of passage such as birth, motherhood, marriage, death, and bereavement; others are interested in exploring less traditional, more fluid, and/or problematic rites such as abortion, living with HI V/AIDS, and coming into political consciousness. Contributors seek ways of linking writing on rites of passage to feminist, postcolonial, and psychoanalytic theories which foreground margins, borders, and the outsider. The three opening essays explore the work of the Zimbabwean writer Yvonne Vera, whose groundbreaking work explored taboo subjects such as infanticide and incest. A wide range of other essays focus on writers from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe. including Jean Rhys, Bharati Mukherjee, Arundhati Roy, Jean Arasanayagam, Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl, and Eva Sallis. Rites of Passage in Postcolonial Women''s Writing will be of interest to scholars working in the fields of postcolonial and modern and contemporary women''s writing, and to students on literature and women''s studies courses who want to study women''s writing from a cross-cultural perspective and from different theoretical positions. Pauline Dodgson-Katiyo is Head of Humanities at Sheffield Hallam University. Her research focus is on African literature (particularly Zimbabwean), contemporary women''s writing, and postcolonial cinemas. Gina Wisker is Professor of Higher Education and Contemporary Literature at the University of Brighton, where she teaches literature, is the head of the centre for learning and teaching, and pursues her research interests in postcolonial women''s writing.

Fiction and Fictionalism

release date: Sep 11, 2009
Fiction and Fictionalism
Are fictional characters such as Sherlock Holmes real? What can fiction tell us about the nature of truth and reality? In this excellent introduction to the problem of fictionalism R. M. Sainsbury covers the following key topics: what is fiction? realism about fictional objects, including the arguments that fictional objects are real but non-existent; real but non-factual; real but non-concrete the relationship between fictional characters and non-actual worlds fictional entities as abstract artefacts fiction and intentionality and the problem of irrealism fictionalism about possible worlds moral fictionalism. R. M. Sainsbury makes extensive use of examples from fiction, such as Sherlock Holmes, Anna Karenina and Madame Bovary and examines the work of philosophers who have made significant contributions to the topic, including Meinong, David Lewis, and Bas Van Fraassen. Additional features include chapter summaries, annotated further reading and a glossary of technical terms, making Fiction and Fictionalism ideal for those coming to the issue for the first time.

Magical Realism and the Postcolonial Novel

release date: Mar 19, 2009
Magical Realism and the Postcolonial Novel
This book rethinks the origins and nature of magical realism and provides detailed readings of key novels by Asturias, Carpentier, García Márquez, Rushdie, and Okri. Identifying two different strands of the mode, one characterized by faith, the other by irreverence, Warnes makes available a new vocabulary for the discussion of magical realism.

Dostoevsky and Kant

release date: Jan 01, 2009
Dostoevsky and Kant
"In this book, Evgenia Cherkasova brings the philosopher Kant and the novelist Dostoevsky together in conversations that probe why duty is central to our moral life. She shows that just as Dostoevsky is indebted to Kant, so Kant would profit from the deeply philosophical narratives of Dostoevsky, which engage the problem of evil and the claims of human community. She not only produces a novel reading of Dostoevsky, but also guides us to later, often neglected Kantian texts. This study is written with scholarly care, penetrating analysis, elegance of style, and moral urgency: Cherkasova writes with both mind and heart." Emily Grosholz, Professor of Philosophy, The Pennsylvania State University Social Philosophy (SP), in conjunction with the Center for Ethics, Peace and Social Justice, SUNY Cortland, explores theoretical and applied issues in contemporary social philosophy, drawing on a variety of philosophical traditions.

Gender and Laughter

release date: Jan 01, 2009
Gender and Laughter
This essay collection is dedicated to intersections between gender theories and theories of laughter, humour, and comedy. It is based on the results of a three-year research programme, entitled “Gender – Laughter – Media” (2003-2006) and includes a series of investigations on traditional and modern media in western cultures from the 18th to the 20th century. A theoretical opening part is followed by four thematic sections that explore the multiple forms of irritating stereotypical gender perceptions; aspects of (post-)colonialism and multiculturalism; the comic impact of literary and media genres in different national cultures; as well as the different comic strategies in fictional, philosophical, artistic or real life communication. The volume presents a variety of new approaches to the overlaps between gender and laughter that have only barely been considered in groundbreaking research. It forms a valuable read for scholars of literary, theatre, media, and cultural studies, at the same time reaching out to a general readership.

Common Reading

release date: Jan 01, 2008
Common Reading
Stefan Collini explores aspects of the literary and intellectual culture of Britain from the early 20th century to the present. He focuses on critics and historians who wrote for a non-specialist readership, and on the periodicals and other genres through which they attempted to reach that readership.

Oscar Wilde

release date: Jan 01, 2008
Oscar Wilde
Mary Shelley''s Frankenstein, a story she wrote at the age of 19, is still a popular tale to this day, remarkable not only for its striking plot but also its Romantic elements. Part of the Bloom''s Classic Critical Views series, this book includes selections of some of the best historical criticism about Mary Shelley and her works.
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