New Release Books by Darrell Bricker

Darrell Bricker is the author of Next (2020), Empty Planet (2019), The Big Shift (2013), Canuckology (2010), What Canadians Think (about Almost Everything) (2006) and , Searching for Certainty (2002).

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6 results found

Next

release date: Mar 31, 2020
Next
Longlisted for the National Business Book Award Where will the world go after COVID-19? CEO of Ipsos Public Affairs Darrell Bricker's prescient and timely new book has the insights and the data to understand what we are going through and why, and who we still are despite the disruption. While the world around us has changed, Bricker's extensive research and analysis resonate for the future. In this groundbreaking new book, Bricker, a Canadian expert in what Canadians will want and need, distills the trends based on real and extensive demographic data and dares to forecast what will come next. Why is Harley-Davidson making smaller motorcycles and changing the way they sell their bikes? Should restaurateurs be focusing on vibrant, frenetic restaurants offering the latest food fashion or on open, quieter restaurants that focus on tasty standard fare? What’s the fastest-growing sector in the housing market? Where should companies plan on setting up shop? Why do we face a population crisis? Which provinces will become the haves and which the have-nots? Where will Canadians be emigrating from, and where will they live? Should we be building more hockey arenas or basketball courts, or even cricket pitches? Next is the first book in decades that offers an honest, often provocative prescription for where we will live, what we’ll be buying and who our leaders will be in the decades to come. Filled with stories of Canadians making critical decisions for their businesses and their personal lives, Next will appeal to a wide audience: anyone who is wondering where they should look for their next job or where they might plan on living in retirement—even how they will live in Canada’s ever-changing future.

Empty Planet

release date: Feb 05, 2019
Empty Planet
An award-winning journalist and leading international social researcher make the provocative argument that the global population will soon begin to decline, dramatically reshaping the social, political, and economic landscape For half a century, statisticians, pundits, and politicians have warned that a burgeoning population will soon overwhelm the earth's resources. But a growing number of experts are sounding a different alarm. Rather than continuing to increase exponentially, they argue, the global population is headed for a steep decline—and in many countries, that decline has already begun. In Empty Planet, John Ibbitson and Darrell Bricker find that a smaller global population will bring with it many benefits: fewer workers will command higher wages; the environment will improve; the risk of famine will wane; and falling birthrates in the developing world will bring greater affluence and autonomy for women. But enormous disruption lies ahead, too. We can already see the effects in Europe and parts of Asia, as aging populations and worker shortages weaken the economy and impose crippling demands on healthcare and social security. The United States and Canada are well-positioned to successfully navigate these coming demographic shifts--that is, unless growing isolationism leads us to close ourselves off just as openness becomes more critical to our survival than ever. Rigorously researched and deeply compelling, Empty Planet offers a vision of a future that we can no longer prevent--but one that we can shape, if we choose. Praise for Empty Planet “An ambitious reimagining of our demographic future.”—The New York Times Book Review “The authors combine a mastery of social-science research with enough journalistic flair to convince fair-minded readers of a simple fact: Fertility is falling faster than most experts can readily explain, driven by persistent forces.”—The Wall Street Journal “The beauty of this book is that it links hard-to-grasp global trends to the easy to-understand individual choices being made all over the world today . . . a gripping narrative of a world on the cusp of profound change.”—The New Statesman “John Ibbitson and Darrell Bricker have written a sparkling and enlightening guide to the contemporary world of fertility as small family sizes and plunging rates of child-bearing go global.”–The Globe and Mail

The Big Shift

release date: Feb 26, 2013
The Big Shift
For almost its entire history, Canada has been run by the political, media and business elites of Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal. But in the past few years, these groups have lost their power—and most of them still do not realize it’s gone. The Laurentian Consensus, the term John Ibbitson has coined for the dusty liberal elite, has been replaced by a new, powerful coalition based in the West and supported by immigrant voters in Ontario. How did this happen? Most people are unaware that the keystone economic and political drivers of this country are now Western Canada and immigrants from China, India and other Asian countries. Politicians and businesspeople have underestimated how conservative these newcomers are making our country. Canada, with its ever-evolving economy and fluid demographic base, has become divorced from the traditions of its past and is moving in an entirely new direction. In The Big Shift, Darrell Bricker and John Ibbitson argue that one of the world’s most consensual countries is becoming polarized, exhibiting stark differences between East and West, cities and suburbs, Canadianborn citizens and immigrants. The winners—in both politics and business— will be those who can capitalize on the tremendous changes that the Big Shift will bring.

Canuckology

release date: Sep 20, 2010
Canuckology
The anonymity of a phone line is the secret to the success for Darrell Bricker and John Wright of Ipsos Reid, the largest market research company in Canada. Ipsos' accuracy in gathering people's thoughts and predicting trends makes them the go-to source for major companies seeking answers to unusual questions, such as: What would your ideal lover look like? Would you rather touch the Stanley Cup or Dorothy's ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz? And, do you believe in ghosts? In Canuckology, Wright and Bricker, the bestselling authors of What Canadians Think about Almost Everything, share with us the wealth of their thousands of polls, drawn from conversations with some unlikely characters, including the retired man who still believes in Santa Claus, the non-parent who freaks out about toy safety, and the woman who would rather take her dad to a movie premiere than George Clooney. Filled with hilarious insights from every province and territory, as well as from people of every age, gender and economic standing -- and peppered with fun factoids and quizzes -- Canuckology is compulsive, must-have reading for any Canadian.

What Canadians Think (about Almost Everything)

release date: Jun 27, 2006
What Canadians Think (about Almost Everything)
-What percentage of Canadians would prefer a good night's sleep to good sex? -What percentage of Canadians mow the lawn wearing open-toed shoes? -Which gender is more likely to be left standing at the altar? -What percentage of Canadians supports labelling GMOs? -What is the likelihood that a Canadian believes that "Satan, the devil, is active in the world today"? Read through and find out. Funny, informative, and often surprising, What Canadians Think" "is based on hard statistics that add up to the inside story of what Canadians like, what we don't like, what we believe, what we don't believe, what we're not sure of. You want to know who we are and what we're becoming? Ask John Wright and Darrell Bricker of Ipsos-Reid. They've got all the numbers. Focusing on the concentric worlds in which we live -- home and work, community, nation, and world -- Wright and Bricker, Canada's leading pollsters, roll up their sleeves and get to work. These guys dig into relationships. They look at marriage and morals and drinking and drugs. They delve into power, politics, parenting, and internet porn. Sex and stress. Death and taxes. No one knows Canada better than Ipsos-Reid, the country's largest market research and public opinion firm, and this book puts their research at your fingertips. Both lighthearted and rigorously detailed, What Canadians Think" "is fascinating reading for anyone. Whether you're a marketing executive, or just someone who's curious about the nut case around the corner, you won't put it down.

Searching for Certainty

release date: Jan 01, 2002
Searching for Certainty
“The 1990s was a decade of reckoning that compressed our spirits as well as our bank accounts. We hunkered down through a prolonged winter of decline before finally, at decade’s end, emerging to breathe in the first stirrings of national recovery. The long journey tested our confidence in the country, its governments, our employers and even ourselves.... Happily, we discovered a new inner strength, and the wisdom to take advantage of global trends and to build a new social and cultural Canada in the post-Trudeau era.” -- from Searching for Certainty Darrell Bricker, president of the leading market research firm in Canada, and Ed Greenspon, political columnist for The Globe and Mail, join forces to offer a comprehensive report on the new economic, social and cultural Canada - the dramatic changes wrought by globalization and technologicial innovation over the last two decades as well as the more subtle shifts in how we approach work, health care and education. Using the most up-to-date and complete data available, they analyze economic trends, from global trade to the workplace, and trace the ways in which Canadian society and culture have been transformed. They reveal that Canada has emerged from the late twentieth century a stronger and more dynamic society. Far from becoming more American, the new mindset is steeped in Canadian traditions of tolerance and community. In the aftermath of the 1990s, Canada is a society searching more than ever before for certainy, not promises - for quality of life, not quantity of goods. One example: a decade ago, Canadians had never heard of the Internet, and the public equated new technology with job loss. By the fall of 2000, 70 per cent of adults -- more than 15 million individuals -- were connected to the Internet at home or work or school. By the end of 2001, four out of five Canadians will probably enjoy access. How is the Internet changing our health care, our political unity, how we shop, even our power in relation to governments and corporations? Searching for Certainty is a smart and entertaining, fact-filled account of how the changes over the last two decades affect us now and will determine how we feel and what we want tomorrow. Combining demographic statistics with a journalist's keen eye for real-life stories, Bricker and Greenspon offer valuable insights for business and public policy, and practical tips on how to survive and prosper in the new economy.
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