New Release Books by Plato

Plato is the author of The Republic (2022), The Allegory of the Cave (2019), Plato's Symposium (2021), Apology (2018), Lysis and other 396 books.

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The Republic

by: Plato
release date: Apr 22, 2022
The Republic
The Republic - Plato - What is justice? In Plato’s Socratic dialogue, The Republic, the citizens of ancient Greece explore the world’s most fundamental question. In search of an ideal civilization, Socrates leads Glaucon, Polemarchus, Thrasymachus, and others in debates about various subjects, including justice, truth, class, and art. For without righteousness, tyranny and injustice give rise to oligarchy. The influential dialogues of The Republic helped shape all of Western literature and philosophical thought. It is as much a doctrine of ethics and politics now as it was for the ancient Greeks, and its dilemma remains: how to create a perfect society populated by very imperfect human beings. Plato was the most famous of the Greek philosophers, aside from his teacher Socrates. He founded the Academy in Athens, written dialogue, political philosophy, epistemology, the concept of religion, and many other crucial elements of thought. All were attributed to Plato, which laid the framework for Western philosophy as we know it. He was also credited for famed protégé Aristotle, whose contributions to philosophy and thought are often deemed of equal or greater importance.

The Allegory of the Cave

by: Plato
release date: Dec 20, 2019
The Allegory of the Cave
The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato''s Cave, was presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work Republic (514a–520a) to compare "the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature". It is written as a dialogue between Plato''s brother Glaucon and his mentor Socrates, narrated by the latter. The allegory is presented after the analogy of the sun (508b–509c) and the analogy of the divided line (509d–511e). All three are characterized in relation to dialectic at the end of Books VII and VIII (531d–534e). Plato has Socrates describe a group of people who have lived chained to the wall of a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall from objects passing in front of a fire behind them, and give names to these shadows. The shadows are the prisoners'' reality.

Plato's Symposium

release date: Sep 09, 2021
Plato's Symposium
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Apology

by: Plato
release date: Aug 20, 2018
Apology
The Apology of Socrates was written by Plato. In fact, it’s a defensive speech of Socrates that he said in a court noted down by Plato.The main subject of the speech is a problem of the evil. Socrates insists that neither death nor death sentence is evil. We shouldn’t be afraid of the death because we don’t know anything about it. Socrates proved that the death shouldn’t be taken as the evil with the following dilemma: the death is either a peace or a transit from this life to the next. Both can’t be called evil. Consequently, the death shouldn’t be treated as evil.

Lysis

by: Plato
Lysis
No answer is given in the Lysis to the question, ''What is Friendship?'' any more than in the Charmides to the question, ''What is Temperance?'' There are several resemblances in the two Dialogues: the same youthfulness and sense of beauty pervades both of them; they are alike rich in the description of Greek life. The question is again raised of the relation of knowledge to virtue and good, which also recurs in the Laches; and Socrates appears again as the elder friend of the two boys, Lysis and Menexenus. In the Charmides, as also in the Laches, he is described as middle-aged; in the Lysis he is advanced in years.

Ion

by: Plato
Ion
The Ion is the shortest, or nearly the shortest, of all the writings which bear the name of Plato, and is not authenticated by any early external testimony. The grace and beauty of this little work supply the only, and perhaps a sufficient, proof of its genuineness. The plan is simple; the dramatic interest consists entirely in the contrast between the irony of Socrates and the transparent vanity and childlike enthusiasm of the rhapsode Ion. The theme of the Dialogue may possibly have been suggested by the passage of Xenophon''s Memorabilia in which the rhapsodists are described by Euthydemus as ''very precise about the exact words of Homer, but very idiotic themselves.'' (Compare Aristotle, Met.)

Euthyphro

by: Plato
Euthyphro
In the Meno, Anytus had parted from Socrates with the significant words: ''That in any city, and particularly in the city of Athens, it is easier to do men harm than to do them good;'' and Socrates was anticipating another opportunity of talking with him. In the Euthyphro, Socrates is awaiting his trial for impiety. But before the trial begins, Plato would like to put the world on their trial, and convince them of ignorance in that very matter touching which Socrates is accused. An incident which may perhaps really have occurred in the family of Euthyphro, a learned Athenian diviner and soothsayer, furnishes the occasion of the discussion.

Sophist

by: Plato
Sophist
The Sophist is a Platonic dialogue from the philosopher''s late period, most likely written in 360 BC. Its main theme is to identify what a sophist is and how a sophist differs from a philosopher and statesman.

Parmenides

by: Plato
Parmenides
Parmenides of Elea was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher from Elea in Magna Graecia. He is thought to have been in his prime around 475 BC.

The Essential Plato

by: Plato
release date: Nov 03, 2020
The Essential Plato
Three Socratic dialogues by the ancient Greek philosopher who established the foundations of Western thought. Apology: In this classic text, Plato recounts the trial of his mentor Socrates, who stands accused of rejecting the gods and corrupting the youth of Athens. As recounted by Plato, Socrates defends himself with a profound examination of integrity, citizenship, the nature of truth, and the role of a philosopher. Symposium: Here Plato depicts a group of Athenian intellectuals discussing the nature of desire. One after another, Agathon, Aristodemus, Eryximachus, Pausanias, and Aristophanes share their perspectives on gender, love, sexuality, and human instincts. The dialogue culminates in the radical views of Socrates, who advocates transcendence through spiritual worship. The Republic: Plato’s magnum opus is a wide-ranging and deeply influential meditation on society as a whole. Plato explores the concept of justice, the connection between politics and psychology, the difference between words and what they represent, and the roles of art and education, among many other topics.

Eryxias

by: Plato
release date: Nov 29, 2019
Eryxias
"Eryxias" by Plato (translated by Benjamin Jowett). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Plato: The Apology of Socrates and Xenophon: The Apology of Socrates

release date: Apr 30, 2019
Plato: The Apology of Socrates and Xenophon: The Apology of Socrates
Provides a student edition of Plato and Xenophon''s accounts of how Socrates, on trial for his life, defended himself and his philosophy.

Charmides

by: Plato
release date: Jan 15, 2019
Charmides
"Moore and Raymond''s Charmides is very impressive. The translation is excellent, and the Introduction and notes guide the reader into thorny problems in a way that renders them understandable: e.g., how to translate sôphrosunê, why we should care about self-knowledge, or how to seek to clarify important ethico-political concepts. The result provides almost all of what an instructor will need to introduce this unjustly neglected dialogue into a syllabus. Moreover, the volume is a wide-ranging resource for specialists. Students of the ''Socratic Dialogues'' will profit greatly from this admirable contribution." —David J. Murphy is co-editor of Antiphontis et Andocidis Orationes (Oxford) and author of "The Basis of the Text of Plato''s Charmides" (Mnemosyne) and many other contributions on the Charmides. He lives in New York City.

Theaetetus

by: Plato
release date: Aug 15, 2018
Theaetetus
A systematic treatment of the question, "What is knowledge?", this masterpiece from Plato''s later period features a dialogue between Socrates and his student, Theaetetus. Translation by Francis M. Cornford, who provides extensive commentaries.

Sophist and Statesman

by: Plato
release date: Jan 10, 2018
Sophist and Statesman
Two dialogues explore a vital concern of a democratic society: how to define the qualities of a genuine statesman as well as the distinction between an authentic statesman and a sophist.

Symposium or Drinking Party

by: Plato
release date: Feb 14, 2017
Symposium or Drinking Party
This new edition of Plato''s Symposium provides beginning readers and scholars alike with a solid, reliable translation that is both faithful to the original text and accessible to contemporary readers. In addition, the volume offers a number of aids to help the reader make his or her way through this remarkable work: A concise introduction sets the scene, conveys the tenor of the dialogue, and introduces the reader to the main characters with a gloss on their backgrounds and a comment on their roles in the dialogue. It also provides a list of basic points for readers to keep in mind as they read the work. A thought-provoking interpretive essay offers reflections on the themes of the dialogue, focusing especially on the dialogue as drama. A select bibliography points to works, both classic and contemporary, that are especially relevant to readers of the Symposium. Two appendices consist of a line drawing that depicts the spacial layout and positioning of characters in the Symposium, and a chart that shows the relation of the first six speeches to number, age, parentage and the function of Eros.

Plato Six Pack

by: Plato
release date: Jan 20, 2017
Plato Six Pack
Plato Six Pack represents the full-range of Plato''s philosophy. Included are six of his original works - Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo, The Allegory of the Cave and Symposium

Critias

by: Plato
release date: Jan 01, 2017
Critias
Originally published in 1980; Greek text retained from earlier edition, commentary updated, with new English translation and introduction.

The Symposium

by: Plato
release date: Dec 15, 2016
The Symposium
In his brilliant dialogue, Symposium, Plato presents an imaginary dinner-party set in Athens in 416 BC where the guests include Aristophanes, Socrates and the most popular Athenian of his day, golden boy Alcibiades. The sequence of dazzling speeches culminates in Socrates'' famous account of the views of Diotima, a prophetess who taught him that love is our means of trying to attain goodness.

Plato: Laws

by: Plato
release date: Sep 08, 2016
Plato: Laws
Plato''s Laws is one of the most important surviving works of ancient Greek political thought. It offers sustained reflection on the enterprise of legislation, and on its role in the social and religious regulation of society in all its aspects. Many of its ideas were drawn upon by later political thinkers, from Aristotle and Cicero to Thomas More and Montesquieu. This book presents the first translation of the complete text of the Laws for thirty-five years, in Tom Griffith''s readable and reliable English. Malcolm Schofield, a leading scholar of Greek philosophy, introduces the main themes and characteristics of the work, as well as supplying authoritative notes on the structure and detail of Plato''s argument, together with a guide to further reading. The book will be a key resource for those interested in Greek philosophy and of the history of political thought.

Plato: The Laws

by: Plato
release date: Sep 08, 2016
Plato: The Laws
A new translation of Plato''s Laws into accessible English, with essential introductory and other explanatory material.

The Apology and Related Dialogues

by: Plato
release date: Apr 25, 2016
The Apology and Related Dialogues
Socrates, one of the first of the great philosophers, left no written works. What survives of his thought are second-hand descriptions of his teachings and conversations—including, most famously, the accounts of his trial and execution composed by his friend, student, and philosophical successor, Plato. In Euthyphro, Socrates examines the concept of piety and displays his propensity for questioning Athenian authorities. Such audacity is not without consequence, and in the Apology we find Socrates defending himself in court against charges of impiety and corruption of the youth. Crito depicts Socrates choosing to accept the resulting death sentence rather than escape Athens and avoid execution. All three dialogues are included here, as is the final scene of Phaedo, in which the sentence is carried out.

The Complete Works of Plato (Unabridged)

by: Plato
release date: Feb 03, 2016
The Complete Works of Plato (Unabridged)
This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of Plato (Unabridged)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Plato (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece. He was also a mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. Table of contents: Early works: Apology Crito Charmides Euthyphro First Alcibiades Greater Hippias Lesser Hippias Ion Laches Lysis Middle works: Cratylus Euthydemus Gorgias Menexenus Meno Phaedo Protagoras Symposium Republic Phaedrus Parmenides Theaetetus Late works: Timaeus Critias Sophist Statesman Philebus Laws Pseudonymous works (traditionally attributed to Plato, but considered by virtually all modern authorities not to have been written by him): Epinomis Second Alcibiades Hipparcus Rival Lovers Theages Cleitophon Minos Demoducus Axiochus On Justice On Virtue Sisyphus Eryxias Halcyon Letters There are also included a number of essays relating to various aspects of Plato''s works.

Philebus

release date: Sep 01, 2015
Philebus
THE Philebus appears to be one of the later writings of Plato, in which the style has begun to alter, and the dramatic and poetical element has become subordinate to the speculative and philosophical. In the development of abstract thought great advances have been made on the Protagoras or the Phaedrus, and even on the Republic. But there is a corresponding diminution of artistic skill, a want of character in the persons, a laboured march in the dialogue, and a degree of confusion and incompleteness in the general design. As in the speeches of Thucydides, the multiplication of ideas seems to interfere with the power of expression. Instead of the equally diffused grace and ease of the earlier dialogues there occur two or three highly-wrought passages (pp. 15, 16, 63); instead of the ever-flowing play of humour, now appearing, now concealed, but always present, are inserted a good many bad jests, as we may venture to term them (cp. 17 E, 23 B, D, 28 C, 29 B, 30 E, 34 D, 36 B, 43 A, 46 A, 62 B). Aeterna Press
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