New Release Books by World Health Organization

World Health Organization is the author of Foodborne antimicrobial resistance (2022), WHO global air quality guidelines (2021), WHO consolidated guidelines on tuberculosis (2020), Global Tuberculosis Report 2019 (2019) and other 396 books.

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Foodborne antimicrobial resistance

Foodborne antimicrobial resistance
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious global health threat and a food safety issue of primary concern. Governments and international organizations have recognized that the issue has to be approached in a multidisciplinary manner, addressing animal, plant and human health as well as the environment under the One Health approach. This publication brings together the three Codex texts, two guidelines and a code of practice, that will support governments in designing and running a successful strategy to tackle foodborne AMR.

WHO global air quality guidelines

release date: Sep 07, 2021
WHO global air quality guidelines
The main objective of these updated global guidelines is to offer health-based air quality guideline levels, expressed as long-term or short-term concentrations for six key air pollutants: PM2.5, PM10, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide. In addition, the guidelines provide interim targets to guide reduction efforts of these pollutants, as well as good practice statements for the management of certain types of PM (i.e., black carbon/elemental carbon, ultrafine particles, particles originating from sand and duststorms). These guidelines are not legally binding standards; however, they provide WHO Member States with an evidence-informed tool, which they can use to inform legislation and policy. Ultimately, the goal of these guidelines is to help reduce levels of air pollutants in order to decrease the enormous health burden resulting from the exposure to air pollution worldwide.

WHO consolidated guidelines on tuberculosis

release date: Apr 07, 2020
WHO consolidated guidelines on tuberculosis
The WHO consolidated guidelines on tuberculosis: tuberculosis preventive treatment provides a comprehensive set of recommendations for programmatic management of tuberculosis preventive treatment (PMTPT) geared towards the implementers of the WHO End TB Strategy and also for countries intent upon TB elimination (9). The guidelines are to be used primarily in national TB and HIV and maternal and child programmes or their equivalents in ministries of health and for other policy-makers working on TB, HIV, infectious diseases and maternal and child health. They are also appropriate for staff of ministries of justice, correctional services and other government agencies which deliver healthcare, including prison services, social services and immigration. The guidelines are also intended for clinicians in the public or the private sectors working on TB, HIV, infectious diseases, prevention, child health and noncommunicable diseases such as chronic kidney disease and cancer. The persons directly affected by the guidelines are risk groups for whom TB preventive treatment is recommended.

Global Tuberculosis Report 2019

release date: Aug 12, 2019
Global Tuberculosis Report 2019
WHO has published a global TB report every year since 1997. The main aim of the report is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of the TB epidemic, and of progress in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease, at global, regional and country levels. This is done in the context of recommended global TB strategies and targets endorsed by WHO?s Member States, broader development goals set by the United Nations (UN) and targets set in the political declaration at the first UN high-level meeting on TB (held in September 2018). The 2019 edition of the global TB report was released on 17 October 2019. The data in this report are updated annually. Please note that direct comparisons between estimates of TB disease burden in the latest report and previous reports are not appropriate. The most recent time-series of estimates are published in the 2019 global TB report.

WHO Global Report on Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2019

release date: May 16, 2019
WHO Global Report on Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2019
This report is structured in five parts: national framework for traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM); product regulation; practices and practitioners; the challenges faced by countries; and finally the country profiles. Apart from the section on practices and practitioners the report is consistent with the format of the report of the first global survey in order to provide a useful comparison. The section on practices and practitioners which covers providers education and health insurance is a new section incorporated to reflect the emerging trends in T&CM and to gather new information regarding these topics at a national level. All new information received has been incorporated into individual country profiles and data graphs. The report captures the three phases of progress made by Member States; that is before and after the first WHO Traditional Medicine Strategy (1999?2005) from the first global survey to the second global survey (2005?2012) and from the second survey to the most recent timeline (2012?2018).

Taking a Multisectoral One Health Approach : A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries

Taking a Multisectoral One Health Approach : A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries
The 2018 FAO-OIE-WHO (Tripartite) zoonoses guide, “Taking A Multisectoral, One Health Approach: A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries” (2018 TZG) is being jointly developed to provide member countries with practical guidance on OH approaches to build national mechanisms for multisectoral coordination, communication, and collaboration to address zoonotic disease threats at the animal-human-environment interface. The 2018 TZG updates and expands on the guidance in the one previous jointly-developed, zoonoses-specific guidance document: the 2008 Tripartite “Zoonotic Diseases: A Guide to Establishing Collaboration between Animal and Human Health Sectors at the Country Level”, developed in WHO South-East Asia Region and Western Pacific Region. The 2018 TZG supports building by countries of the resilience and capacity to address emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases such as avian influenza, rabies, Ebola, and Rift Valley fever, as well as food-borne diseases and antimicrobial resistance, and to minimize their impacts on health, livelihoods, and economies. It additionally supports country efforts to implement WHO International Health Regulations (2005) and OIE international standards, to address gaps identified through external and internal health system evaluations, and to achieve targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. The 2018 TZG provides relevant country ministries and agencies with lessons learned and good practices identified from country-level experiences in taking OH approaches for preparedness, prevention, detection and response to zoonotic disease threats, and provides guidance on multisectoral communication, coordination, and collaboration. It informs on regional and country-level OH activities and relevant unisectoral and multisectoral tools available for countries to use.

INSPIRE Handbook

release date: Feb 26, 2019
INSPIRE Handbook
INSPIRE is a resource to help governments, international agencies, and non-government organisations prevent and respond to violence against children. It was developed by 10 international and U.S.-based agencies and includes strategy documents and implementation tools. This handbook provides guidance on how to choose and implement interventions based on specific needs and context, and is organised around the 7 key INSPIRE strategies: implementation and enforcement of laws; norms and values; safe environments; parent and caregiver support; income and economic strengthening; response and support services; and education and life skills. The handbook also provides an overview of implementation and impact indicators, drawn from the companion document ''INSPIRE indicator guidance and results framework''.

Delivering Quality Health Services: A Global Imperative

release date: Jul 05, 2018
Delivering Quality Health Services: A Global Imperative
This report describes the current situation with regard to universal health coverage and global quality of care, and outlines the steps governments, health services and their workers, together with citizens and patients need to urgently take.

World Health Statistics 2018

release date: Jun 28, 2018
World Health Statistics 2018
The World Health Statistics series is WHO''s annual compilation of health statistics for its 194 member states. World health statistics 2018 focuses on the health and health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and associated targets by bringing together data on a wide range of health-related SDG indicators. It also links to the three SDG-aligned strategic priorities of the WHO''s 13th General Programme of Work, 2019-2023. World health statistics 2018 is organised into three parts. First, in order to improve understanding and interpretation of the data presented, Part 1 outlines the different types of data used and provides an overview of their compilation, processing and analysis. The resulting statistics are then publicised by WHO through its flagship products such as the World Health Statistics series. In Part 2, summaries are provided of the current status of selected health-related SDG indicators at global and regional levels, based on data available as of early 2018. In Part 3, each of these three strategic priorities of achieving universal health coverage (UHC), addressing health emergencies and promoting healthier populations are illustrated through the use of highlight stories. In Annexes A and B, country-level statistics are presented for selected health-related SDG indicators. Annex B presents statistics at WHO regional and global levels.

Residue Evaluation of Certain Veterinary Drugs

Residue Evaluation of Certain Veterinary Drugs
This volume of FAO JECFA Monographs contains residue evaluation of certain veterinary drugs prepared at the 85th Meeting of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), held in Geneva, 17–26 October 2017. This was the twenty-fifth JECFA meeting specifically convened to consider residues of veterinary drugs in food. The Committee elaborated principles for evaluating the safety of residues of veterinary drugs in food, for establishing acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and acute reference doses (ARfDs) and for recommending maximum residue limits (MRLs) for such residues when the drugs under consideration are administered to food-producing animals in accordance with good practice in the use of veterinary drugs (GVP). Furthermore, the committee evaluated the safety of residues of eight veterinary drugs and responded to specific concerns raised by the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods. The enclosed monographs provide the scientific basis for the recommendations of MRLs, including information on chemical identity and properties of the compounds, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, residue depletion studies and analytical methods validated and used for the detection and quantification of the compounds. This publication and other documents produced by JECFA contain information that is useful to all those who work with or are involved with recommending or controlling maximum residue limits for veterinary drugs in food.

World Malaria Report 2019

release date: Aug 28, 2019
World Malaria Report 2019
The World Malaria Report 2019 provides a comprehensive update on global and regional malaria data and trends. The report tracks investments in malaria programs and research as well as progress across all intervention areas: prevention, diagnosis, treatment, elimination, and surveillance. It also includes dedicated chapters on the consequences of malaria on maternal infant and child health the "High Burden to High Impact" approach as well as biological threats to the fight against malaria. The 2019 report is based on information received from more than 80 countries and areas with ongoing malaria transmission. This information is supplemented by data from national household surveys and databases held by other organizations.

WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2019

release date: Jan 10, 2020
WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2019
The report "Offering help to quit tobacco use" tracks the status of the tobacco epidemic and interventions to combat it. The report finds that more countries have implemented tobacco control policies, ranging from graphic pack warnings and advertising bans to no smoking areas. About 5 billion people - 65% of the world''s population - are covered by at least one comprehensive tobacco control measure, which has more than quadrupled since 2007 when only 1 billion people and 15% of the world''s population were covered.

Global Diffusion of EHealth: Making Universal Health Coverage Achievable

release date: Mar 27, 2017
Global Diffusion of EHealth: Making Universal Health Coverage Achievable
This third global survey of the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth (GOe) investigated how eHealth can support universal health coverage(UHC) in Member States. A total of 125 countries participated in the survey ? a clear reflection of the growing interest in this area. The report considers eHealth foundations built through policy development funding approaches and capacity building in eHealth through the training of students and professionals. It then observes specific eHealth applications such as mHealth telehealth electronic health records systems and eLearning and how these contribute to the goals of UHC. Of interest is the extent to which legal frameworks protect patient privacy in EHRs as health care systems move towards to delivering safer more efficient and more accessible health care. Finally the rapidly emerging areas of social media for health care as well as big data for research and planning are reported.

Atlas of EHealth Country Profiles: The Use of EHealth in Support of Universal Health Coverage

release date: Jun 22, 2016
Atlas of EHealth Country Profiles: The Use of EHealth in Support of Universal Health Coverage
The third global survey on eHealth conducted by the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth (GOe)1 has a special focus - the use of eHealth in support of universal health coverage. eHealth plays a vital role in promoting universal health coverage in a variety of ways. For instance it helps provide services to remote populations and underserved communities through telehealth or mHealth. It facilitates the training of the health workforce through the use of eLearning and makes education more widely accessible especially for those who are isolated. It enhances diagnosis and treatment by providing accurate and timely patient information through electronic health records. And through the strategic use of ICT it improves the operations and financial efficiency of health care systems. This Atlas presents data collected on 125 WHO Member States. The survey was undertaken by the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth between April and August 2015 and represents the most current information on the use of eHealth in these countries.

World Health Statistics 2016

release date: Jun 08, 2016
World Health Statistics 2016
The World Health Statistics series is WHO''s annual compilation of health statistics for its 194 Member States. The World Health Statistics 2016focuses on the health and health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and associated targets. It represents an initial effort to bring together available data on SDG health and health-related indicators, providing an assessment of the situation in 2016. The SDG health goal -- ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages -- includes 13 targets, covering all major health priorities, and including the unfinished and expanded Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) agenda, four targets to address noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), mental health, injuries and environmental issues, and four "means of implementation" targets. This report also seeks to demonstrate the critical linkages between health and other SDGs by including indicators of selected health determinants and risk factors in other SDG targets. The series is produced by the WHO Department of Information, Evidence and Research, of the Health Systems and Innovation Cluster. As in previous years, World Health Statistics 2016 has been compiled using publications and databases produced and maintained by WHO technical programs and regional offices. WHO presents World Health Statistics 2016as an integral part of its ongoing efforts to provide enhanced access to comparable high-quality statistics on core measures of population health and national health systems. Unless otherwise stated, all estimates have been cleared following consultation with Member States and are published here as official WHO figures.

Evaluation of Certain Food Additives and Contaminants

release date: May 18, 2016
Evaluation of Certain Food Additives and Contaminants
This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee’s evaluations of technical toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed B-glucanase cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed B-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) – polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solvent-extracted bixin and solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committee’s recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting.

Integrating Neglected Tropical Diseases in Global Health and Development: Fourth Who Report on Neglected Tropical Diseases

release date: Feb 06, 2018
Integrating Neglected Tropical Diseases in Global Health and Development: Fourth Who Report on Neglected Tropical Diseases
This report evaluates the changing global public health landscape; assesses progress towards the 2020 targets; and considers the possible core elements of a strategic vision to integrating neglected tropical diseases into the 2030 Agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals. Advances have been made through expanded interventions delivered through five public health approaches: innovative and intensified disease management; preventive chemotherapy; vector ecology and management; veterinary public health services; and the provision of safe water, sanitation and hygiene. In 2015 alone nearly one billion people were treated for at least one disease and significant gains were achieved in relieving the symptoms and consequences of diseases for which effective tools are scarce; important reductions were achieved in the number of new cases of sleeping sickness, of visceral leishmaniasis in South-East Asia and also of Buruli ulcer. The report also considers vector control strategies and discusses the importance of the draft WHO Global Vector Control Response 2017-2030. It argues that veterinary public health requires a multifaceted approach across the human-animal interface as well as a multisectoral program of work to protect and improve the physical, mental and social well-being of humans, including veterinary, water, sanitation and hygiene. Integration of activities and interventions into broader health systems is crucial, and despite challenges, has the potential to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage while advancing the 2030 Agenda. In short, this report drives the message home that "no one must be left behind."

Health Employment and Economic Growth

release date: Dec 08, 2017
Health Employment and Economic Growth
Powerful demographic and economic forces are shaping health workforce needs and demands worldwide. Effectively addressing growing population need and economic demand for health workers stands as one of our foremost global challenges. It also represents an opportunity to secure a future that is healthy, peaceful and prosperous. The contents of this book give direction and detail to a richer and more holistic understanding of the health workforce through the presentation of new evidence and solutions focused analysis. It sets out, under one cover, a series of research studies and papers that were commissioned to provide evidence for the High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth. The 17 chapters in this book are grouped into four parts: - Health workforce dynamics - Economic value and investment - Education and production - Addressing inefficiencies.

WHO Recommendations for Prevention and Treatment of Maternal Peripartum Infections

release date: Feb 12, 2016
WHO Recommendations for Prevention and Treatment of Maternal Peripartum Infections
The goal of the present guideline is to consolidate guidance for effective interventions that are needed to reduce the global burden of maternal infections and its complications around the time of childbirth. This forms part of WHO''s efforts towards improving the quality of care for leading causes of maternal death especially those clustered around the time of childbirth in the post-MDG era. Specifically it presents evidence-based recommendations on interventions for preventing and treating genital tract infections during labour childbirth or puerperium with the aim of improving outcomes for both mothers and newborns. The primary audience for this guideline is health professionals who are responsible for developing national and local health protocols and policies as well as managers of maternal and child health programmes and policy-makers in all settings. The guideline will also be useful to those directly providing care to pregnant women including obstetricians midwives nurses and general practitioners. The information in this guideline will be useful for developing job aids and tools for both pre- and inservice training of health workers to enhance their delivery of care to prevent and treat maternal peripartum infections.

Global Tuberculosis Report 2017

release date: Dec 13, 2017
Global Tuberculosis Report 2017
WHO''s Global Tuberculosis Report provides a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of the TB epidemic and of progress in care and prevention at global, regional and country levels. This is done in the context of recommended global TB strategies and associated targets, and broader development goals. For the period 2016-2035, these are WHO''s End TB Strategy and the United Nations'' (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which share a common aim: to end the global TB epidemic. The main data sources for the report are annual rounds of global TB data collection implemented by WHO''s Global TB Program since 1995 and databases maintained by other WHO departments, UNAIDS and the World Bank. In WHO''s 2017 round of global TB data collection, 201 countries and territories that account for over 99% of the world''s population and TB cases reported data.

WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations

release date: Jan 01, 2016
WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations
The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations advises the Director-General of WHO in the area of medicines quality assurance. It provides independent expert recommendations and guidance to ensure that medicines meet standards of quality, safety and efficacy in all WHO Member States. Its advice is developed through a broad consensus-building process and covers all areas of quality assurance of medicines, from their development to their distribution to patients. In the area of quality control, the Expert Committee reviewed new and revised specifications and general texts for inclusion in The International Pharmacopoeia, and received the annual report of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM), the custodian centre for International Chemical Reference Substances (ICRS). The Committee adopted a number of monographs, general texts and ICRS. It noted the report on Phase 6 of the External Quality Assurance Assessment Scheme (EQAAS) and on new approaches to ensure sustainability of this scheme through user fees. The Committee further acknowledged the progress of good pharmacopoeial practices (GPhP), and adopted the document on GPhP which was prepared by the consecutive international meetings of world pharmacopoeias. In the various quality assurance-related areas the Expert Committee was presented with a number of new and revised guidelines related to good manufacturing practices (GMP), distribution and trade of pharmaceuticals and regulatory practice. It adopted 10 guidelines as listed below as well as 22 new specifications and general texts for inclusion in The International Pharmacopoeia. The Committee took note of ongoing work to promote collaboration and information exchange through the good regulatory practice project and welcomed the development of a comprehensive set of guidelines for all national regulatory authorities through this project.

Ear and Hearing Care Situation Analysis Tool

release date: Oct 02, 2017
Ear and Hearing Care Situation Analysis Tool
This situation analysis tool facilitates the first step of planning for ear and hearing care. The situation analysis tool is primarily intended for use at national and subnational levels by ear and hearing care planners, ear and hearing care health professionals and policy-makers, as well as by the international and domestic stakeholders working with them. The tool supports the compilation of information that can be used for advocacy, for development of a new strategy or updating of existing strategic plans for ear and hearing care. It facilitates the review of ear and hearing care services, to highlight the gaps and needs for service provision. The results can inform evidence-based decision-making, ensuring efficient use of available resources. The information from the situation analysis should be used to plan an ear and hearing care strategy. A separate manual Ear and Hearing Care - Planning and Monitoring of National Strategies: A Manual (ISBN: 9789241549479) published by WHO provides guidance on this process.

A Guide to Establishing a National Haemovigilance System

release date: Jul 28, 2017
A Guide to Establishing a National Haemovigilance System
Haemovigilance includes the monitoring, reporting, investigation, and analysis of adverse events related to the donation, processing, and transfusion of blood and taking actions to prevent their occurrence or recurrence. The document aims to support countries in establishing effective national systems for haemovigilance throughout the transfusion chain. It provides policy guidance on establishing a haemovigilance system as part of the national blood and health systems and includes technical information and guidance on the specific measures and actions necessary for implementing a haemovigilance system. This document is intended for ministries of health; bodies responsible for policy-making on blood safety, such as national blood commissions or councils; regulatory agencies; public health institutions; blood transfusion services, blood centers, and plasma collection centers; hospitals, including hospital blood banks or health care facilities where transfusion takes place; blood donor organizations and other nongovernmental organizations involved in blood donor education and recruitment; patient groups; scientific and professional bodies; and developmental partners and international organizations.

World Health Statistics 2017

release date: May 23, 2017
World Health Statistics 2017
The World Health Statistics series is WHO''s annual compilation of health statistics for its 194 Member States. The series is produced by the WHO Department of Information, Evidence and Research, and of the Health Systems and Innovation Cluster, in collaboration with all relevant WHO technical departments. World Health Statistics 2017 compiles data on 21 health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) targets with 35 indicators as well as data on life expectancy. This edition also includes, for the first time, success stories from several countries that are making progress towards the health-related SDG targets. World Health Statistics 2017 is organized into three parts. Part 1 describes six lines of action that WHO is now promoting to help build better systems for health and to achieve the health and health-related SDGs. In Part 2, the status of selected health-related SDG indicators is summarized at both global and regional level based on data available as of early 2017. Part 3 presents a selection of stories that highlight recent successful efforts by countries to improve and protect the health of their populations through one or more of the six lines of action. Annexes A and B present country-level estimates for selected health-related SDG indicators. As in previous years, World Health Statistics 2017 has been compiled primarily using publications and databases produced and maintained by WHO or United Nations groups of which WHO is a member such as the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (IGME). Additionally, a number of statistics have been derived from data produced and maintained by other international organizations such as the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) and its Population Division.

Global Report on Diabetes

release date: May 31, 2016
Global Report on Diabetes
"Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or glucose), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Diabetes is an important public health problem, one of four priority noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted for action by world leaders. Both the number of cases and the prevalence of diabetes have been steadily increasing over the past few decades. Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. The global prevalence (age-standardized) of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population. This reflects an increase in associated risk factors such as being overweight or obese. Over the past decade, diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Higher-than-optimal blood glucose caused an additional 2.2 million deaths, by increasing the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases. Forty-three percent of these 3.7 million deaths occur before the age of 70 years. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occurs prior to age 70 is higher in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Because sophisticated laboratory tests are usually required to distinguish between type 1 diabetes (which requires insulin injections for survival) and type 2 diabetes (where the body cannot properly use the insulin it produces), separate global estimates of diabetes prevalence for type 1 and type 2 do not exist. The majority of people with diabetes are affected by type 2 diabetes. This used to occur nearly entirely among adults, but now occurs in children too."--Page 6.

Guidelines for Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis and Patient Care

release date: Jun 01, 2017
Guidelines for Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis and Patient Care
The update of the Guidelines for Treatment of Drug-susceptible Tuberculosis and Patient Care is important in the context of the End TB Strategy, which recommends treatment and patient support for all people with TB. This update aims to use the best available evidence on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB and interventions to ensure adequate patient care and support in order to inform policy decisions made in these technical areas by national TB control program managers, national policy-makers, and medical practitioners in a variety of geographical, economic, and social settings. The objectives of these updated guidelines are to provide updated recommendations based on newly emerged evidence on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB and patient care as well as provide a summary of changes in the new guidelines with all the existing and valid WHO recommendations on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB and TB patient care. The key audience for these guidelines are policy-makers in ministries of health or managers of national TB programs who formulate country-specific TB treatment guidelines or who plan TB treatment programs. In addition, health professionals - including doctors, nurses, and educators working both in government services and nongovernmental organizations, such as technical agencies that are treating patients and organizing treatment services - will find these guidelines to be useful.

WHO Global Model Regulatory Framework for Medical Devices Including in Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices

release date: May 09, 2017
WHO Global Model Regulatory Framework for Medical Devices Including in Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices
The Model recommends guiding principles and harmonized definitions and specifies the attributes of effective and efficient regulation to be embodied within binding and enforceable law. Its main elements refer to international harmonization guidance documents developed by the Global Harmonization Task Force (GHTF) and its successor, the International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF). The Model is particularly relevant for WHO Member States with little or no regulation for medical devices currently in place but with the ambition to improve this situation. It foresees that such countries will progress from basic regulatory controls towards an expanded level to the extent that their resources allow. The Model is written for the legislative, executive, and regulatory branches of government as they develop and establish a system of medical devices regulation. It describes the role and responsibilities of a country''s regulatory authority for implementing and enforcing the regulations. Also, it describes circumstances in which a regulatory authority may either "rely on" or "recognize" the work products from trusted regulatory sources (such as scientific assessments, audit, and inspection reports) or from the WHO Prequalification Team. Section 2 of this document recommends definitions of the terms "medical devices" and IVDs. It describes how they may be grouped according to their potential for harm to the patient or user and specifies principles of safety and performance that the device manufacturer must adhere to. It explains how the manufacturer must demonstrate to a regulatory authority that its medical device has been designed and manufactured to be safe and to perform as intended during its lifetime. Section 3 presents the principles of good regulatory practice and enabling conditions for effectively regulating medical devices. It then introduces essential tools for regulation, explaining the function of the regulatory entity and the resources required. Section 4 presents a stepwise approach to implementing and enforcing regulatory controls for medical devices as the regulation progresses from a basic to an expanded level. It describes elements from which a country may choose according to national priorities and challenges. Also, it provides information on when the techniques of reliance and recognition may be considered and on the importance of international convergence of regulatory practice.Section 5 provides a list of additional topics to be considered when developing and implementing regulations for medical devices. It explains the relevance of these topics and provides guidance for regulatory authorities to ensure that they are addressed appropriately. The Model outlines a general approach but cannot provide country-specific guidance on implementation. While it does not offer detailed guidance on regulatory topics, it contains references to relevant documents where further information may be found. It does not detail the responsibilities of other stakeholders such as manufacturers, distributors, procurement agencies, and health-care professionals, all of whom have roles in assuring the quality, safety, and performance of medical devices.

The Selection and Use of Essential Medicines

release date: Jan 01, 2017
The Selection and Use of Essential Medicines
This report presents the recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee responsible for updating the WHO Model Lists of Essential Medicines. It contains a summary of the Committee''s considerations and justifications for additions and changes to the Model Lists, including its recommendations. Annexes to the main report include the revised version of the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (20th edition) and the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines for Children (6th edition). In addition there is a list of all the items on the Model Lists sorted according to their Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification codes.

Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030

release date: Nov 04, 2015
Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030
The World Health Organization''s Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016- 2030 has been developed with the aim to help countries to reduce the human suffering caused by the world''s deadliest mosquito-borne disease. Adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2015 it provides comprehensive technical guidance to countries and development partners for the next 15 years emphasizing the importance of scaling up malaria responses and moving towards elimination. It also highlights the urgent need to increase investments across all interventions - including preventive measures diagnostic testing treatment and disease surveillance- as well as in harnessing innovation and expanding research. By adopting this strategy WHO Member States have endorsed the bold vision of a world free of malaria and set the ambitious new target of reducing the global malaria burden by 90% by 2030. They also agreed to strengthen health systems address emerging multi-drug and insecticide resistance and intensify national cross-border and regional efforts to scale up malaria responses to protect everyone at risk.

Communicating Risk in Public Health Emergencies

release date: May 02, 2018
Communicating Risk in Public Health Emergencies
The recommendations in these guidelines provide overarching, evidence-based guidance on how risk communication should be practiced in an emergency. During public health emergencies, people need to know what health risks they face, and what actions they can take to protect their health and lives. Accurate information provided early, often, and in languages and channels that people understand, trust and use, enables individuals to make choices and take actions to protect themselves, their families and communities from threatening health hazards. The recommendations also guide countries on building capacity for communicating risk during health emergencies. These guidelines provide systems-focused guidance on: - approaches for building trust and engaging with communities and affected populations; - approaches for integrating risk communication into existing national and local emergency preparedness and response structures, including building capacity for risk communication as required of all WHO Member States by the International Health Regulations (2005); and - ERC practice - from strategizing, planning, coordinating, messaging, channelling different methods and approaches of communication and engagement, to monitoring and evaluation - based on a systematic assessment of the evidence on what worked and what did not work during recent emergencies. These guidelines were developed for policy- and decision-makers responsible for managing emergencies, particularly the public health aspects of emergencies, and practitioners responsible for risk communication before, during and after health emergencies. Other groups expected to use these guidelines are: frontline responders; local, national and international development partners; civil society; the private sector; and all organizations, private and public, involved in emergency preparedness and response.

Guidelines on Hepatitis B and C Testing

release date: Feb 06, 2018
Guidelines on Hepatitis B and C Testing
Testing and diagnosis of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infection is the gateway for access to both prevention and treatment services, and is a crucial component of an effective response to the hepatitis epidemic. Early identification of persons with chronic HBV or HCV infection enables them to receive the necessary care and treatment to prevent or delay progression of liver disease. Testing also provides an opportunity to link people to interventions to reduce transmission, through counselling on risk behaviors and provision of prevention commodities (such as sterile needles and syringes) and hepatitis B vaccination. These are the first WHO guidelines on testing for chronic HBV and HCV infection and complement published guidance by WHO on the prevention, care and treatment of chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis B infection. These guidelines outline the public health approach to strengthening and expanding current testing practices for HBV and HCV, and are intended for use across age groups and populations.

World Report on Ageing and Health

release date: Oct 22, 2015
World Report on Ageing and Health
The WHO World report on ageing and health is not for the book shelf it is a living breathing testament to all older people who have fought for their voice to be heard at all levels of government across disciplines and sectors. - Mr Bjarne Hastrup President International Federation on Ageing and CEO DaneAge This report outlines a framework for action to foster Healthy Ageing built around the new concept of functional ability. This will require a transformation of health systems away from disease based curative models and towards the provision of older-person-centred and integrated care. It will require the development sometimes from nothing of comprehensive systems of long term care. It will require a coordinated response from many other sectors and multiple levels of government. And it will need to draw on better ways of measuring and monitoring the health and functioning of older populations. These actions are likely to be a sound investment in society''s future. A future that gives older people the freedom to live lives that previous generations might never have imagined. The World report on ageing and health responds to these challenges by recommending equally profound changes in the way health policies for ageing populations are formulated and services are provided. As the foundation for its recommendations the report looks at what the latest evidence has to say about the ageing process noting that many common perceptions and assumptions about older people are based on outdated stereotypes. The report''s recommendations are anchored in the evidence comprehensive and forward-looking yet eminently practical. Throughout examples of experiences from different countries are used to illustrate how specific problems can be addressed through innovation solutions. Topics explored range from strategies to deliver comprehensive and person-centred services to older populations to policies that enable older people to live in comfort and safety to ways to correct the problems and injustices inherent in current systems for long-term care.

Operational Framework for Building Climate Resilient Health Systems

release date: Feb 15, 2016
Operational Framework for Building Climate Resilient Health Systems
This document presents the World Health Organization (WHO) Operational framework for building climate resilient health systems. The framework responds to the demand from Member States and partners for guidance on how the health sector and its operational basis and health systems can systematically and effectively address the challenges increasingly presented by climate variability and change. This framework has been designed in light of the increasing evidence of climate change and its associated health risks; global, regional and national policy mandates to protect population health; and a rapidly emerging body of practical experience in building health resilience to climate change. Primarily intended for public health professionals and health managers, this framework would also help guide decision-makers in other health-determining sectors, such as nutrition, water and sanitation, and emergency management. International development agencies could use this framework to focus investments and country support for public health, health system strengthening and climate change adaptation. The objective of this framework is to provide guidance for health systems and public health programming to increase their capacity for protecting health in an unstable and changing climate. By implementing the 10 key components laid out in this framework, health organizations, authorities and programs will be better able to anticipate, prevent, prepare for and manage climate-related health risks. Least developed countries and countries in the process of developing the health components of National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (4) may find this document particularly useful in their efforts to design a comprehensive response to the risks presented by short-term climate variability and long-term climate change.

Tracking Universal Health Coverage

release date: Jul 21, 2015
Tracking Universal Health Coverage
This report is the first of its kind to measure health service coverage and financial protection to assess countries'' progress towards universal health coverage. It shows that at least 400 million people do not have access to one or more essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. Universal health coverage (UHC) means that all people receive the quality essential health services they need without being exposed to financial hardship. A significant number of countries at all levels of development are embracing the goal of UHC as the right thing to do for their citizens. It is a powerful social equalizer and contributes to social cohesion and stability. Every country has the potential to improve the performance of its health system in the main dimensions of UHC: coverage of quality services and financial protection for all. Priorities strategies and implementation plans for UHC will differ from one country to another. Enhanced and expanded monitoring of health under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) should seek to build on that experience sharpening our focus on the key health service and financial protection interventions that underpin UHC. Effective UHC tracking is central to achieving the global goals for poverty alleviation and health improvement set by the World Bank Group and WHO. Without it policymakers and decision-takers cannot say exactly where they are or set a course for where they want to go. They cannot know whether they are focussing their efforts in the right areas or whether their efforts are making a difference. Monitoring is thus fundamental to the achievement of UHC objectives. It will also be vital to the realization of the SDGs. This report is a critical step to show how monitoring progress can be done telling us what the state of coverage of interventions and financial protection is and telling us where to focus most.

World Health Statistics 2015

release date: May 14, 2015
World Health Statistics 2015
World Health Statistics 2015 contains WHO''s annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets. This year it also includes highlight summaries on the topics of reducing the gaps between the world''s most-advantaged and least-advantaged countries and on current trends in official development assistance (ODA) for health. As in previous years World Health Statistics 2015 has been compiled using publications and databases produced and maintained by WHO technical programmes and regional offices. A number of demographic and socioeconomic statistics have also been derived from databases maintained by a range of other organizations.

Immunization in Practice

release date: Jan 01, 2015
Immunization in Practice
This practical guide contains seven modules targeted at district and health facility staff. It intends to meet the demands to improve immunization services so as to reach more infants in a sustainable way, building upon the experiences of polio eradication. It includes materials adapted from polio on planning, monitoring and use of data to improve the service, that can be used at any level. Revising the manual has been a team exercise. There are contributions from a large number of experts, organizations and institutions. This new edition has seven modules. Several new vaccines that have become more readily available and used in recent years have been added. Also the section on integration with other health interventions has been expanded as exciting opportunities and experiences have become evident in the years following the previous edition. Module 1: Target diseases and vaccines Module 2: The vaccine cold chain Module 3: Ensuring safe injections Module 4: Microplanning for reaching every community Module 5: Managing an immunization session Module 6: Monitoring and surveillance Module 7: Partnering with communities.

Who Estimates of the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases

release date: Jan 30, 2016
Who Estimates of the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases
Up to now, the global burden of illness and deaths caused by foodborne disease has never been quantified. In order to fill this data vacuum, the World Health Organization (WHO) together with its partners launched in 2006 the Initiative to Estimate the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases. After an initial consultation, WHO in 2007 established a Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG) to lead the initiative. Six taskforces were established under FERG, focusing on groups of hazards or aspects of the methodology. These taskforces commissioned systematic reviews and other studies to provide the data from which to calculate the burden estimates. This report is an outcome of a decade of work by WHO key partners and a number of dedicated individuals. Some additional findings--which cannot be integrated into this report--will be published and user-friendly online tools made available separately. This report and related tools should enable governments and other stakeholders to draw public attention to this often under-estimated problem and mobilize political will and resources to combat foodborne diseases.

Strategizing National Health in the 21st Century

release date: May 23, 2017
Strategizing National Health in the 21st Century
This handbook was designed to provide up-to-date and practical guidance on national health planning and strategizing for health. It establishes a set of best practices to support strategic plans for health and represents the wealth of experience accumulated by WHO on national health policies, strategies, and plans (NHPSPs). WHO has been one of the leading organizations to support countries in the development of NHPSPs. The focus on improving plans has grown in recent years in recognition of the benefits of anchoring a strong national health sector in a written vision based on participation, analysis, and evidence.

World Health Statistics 2021

release date: Jul 13, 2021
World Health Statistics 2021
The World health statistics report is the World Health Organization''s (WHO) annual compilation ofthe most recent available data on health and health-related indicators for its 194 Member States.The 2021 edition features the latest data for 50+ health-related indicators from the SustainableDevelopment Goals (SDG) and WHO Triple Billion targets. The 2021 report additionally focuses onthe human toll and impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, highlighting theimportance of tracking inequalities and the urgency to accelerate progress to get back on track andrecover equitably with the support of robust data and health information systems

World Health Statistics 2019

release date: Jun 01, 2019
World Health Statistics 2019
World Health Statistics 2019 summarizes recent trends and levels in life expectancy and causes of death, and reports on the health and health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and associated targets. Where possible, the 2019 report disaggregates data by WHO region, World Bank income group, and sex; it also discusses differences in health status and access to preventive and curative services, particularly in relation to differences between men and women.
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