New Release Books by Kate Bernheimer

Kate Bernheimer is the author of Fairy Tale Architecture (2020), Fairy Tale Review (2017), How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales (2014), Office at Night (2014) and other 9 books.

For more book recommendations, please check out New York Times® Best Sellers, Children's Book Recommendations or the complete list of Featured Book Lists and Award Winners

13 results found

Fairy Tale Architecture

release date: Oct 01, 2020
Fairy Tale Architecture
Fairy Tale Architecture is a ground-breaking book, the first study to bring architects in conversation with fairy tales in breathtaking designs. Little Red Riding Hood, Baba Yaga, Rapunzel, Jack and the Beanstalk, The Snow Queen: these and more than fifteen other stories designed by Bernheimer Architecture, Snøhetta, Rural Studio, LEVENBETTS, and LTL Architects and many other international vanguards have created stunning works for this groundbreaking collection of architectural fairy tales. Story by story, Andrew Bernheimer and Kate Bernheimer--a brother and sister team as in an old fairy tale--have built the ultimate home for lovers of fiction and design. Snow girls and spinning houses. Paper capes and engineered hair braids. Resin bee hives and infinite libraries. Here are futuristic structures made from traditional stories, inspired by everything from Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen and The Little Match Girl to the Brothers Grimm's Rapunzel and The Juniper Tree to fairy tales by Jorge Luis Borges and Joy Williams and from China, Japan, Russia, Nigeria, and Mexico. A desire for story and shelter counts as among our most ancient instincts, and this dual desire continues to inspire our most imaginative architects and authors today. Fairy Tale Architecture invites the reader into a space of wonder, into a new form that will endure ever after.

Fairy Tale Review

release date: Nov 01, 2017
Fairy Tale Review
Ochre is the color of our earliest stories. It is the color we chose when we wanted to make paintings on the walls of caves, in places that never did learn the name of sunlight. By the grace of small fires we etched in ochre; we coughed at the smoke in a confined area but also the absurdity of things we would later call warmth and light and home. Ochre was the color that permeated our lives, slipped into our fingernails, found its way onto all our clothes, our bedspreads, and the skins of lovers. There is evidence of ochre in caves dating back twenty centuries BC: horses and bison and traces of human hands. The places we have touched, tried to remember. Our tongues made middens of ochre even when we couldn’t see. If fairy tales are a language, as Kate Bernheimer argues, then...ochre is the color in which that language must be written.

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales

release date: Jul 14, 2014
How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales
A Time Out New York Best Book of the Year. “[Bernheimer is] one of literature’s foremost champions of the fairy tale.” —Nylon Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer’s latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer’s girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone. “Deftly blends gloomy fairy tales with existential manifestos. Nine nimble stories confront a spectrum of suffering; loneliness, addiction, poverty, and death lay exposed with open language for all to interpret.” —Entrophy “[Bernheimer], an impassioned advocate for the relevancy of the fairy-tale genre, fills the whole strange, lovely book with such gems, reinventing traditional, timeless tales for new readers.” —Time Out New York “With dinosaurs and pink sisters, shadows and talking dolls, librarians and totems, Bernheimer presents haunting looks at mothers and daughters, the magic of childhood, and the power of illusion, fantasy, and dreams.” —San Francisco Book Review “I’ll read anything [Kate Bernheimer] writes, and I’ll undoubtedly learn more about myself and my own writing than from 100 other books. Truth is, I hope every young writer is lucky enough to discover a particular writer who speaks to her more than any other, a writer whose words reach out through the pages and touch her heart, the way Kate Bernheimer has done for me.” —Electric Literature “Bernheimer manages to tickle the cerebrum without sacrificing surface pleasures.” —Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Office at Night

release date: Jun 15, 2014
Office at Night
Edward Hopper’s painting "Office at Night" is open to endless interpretation. In this collaborative novella, Kate Bernheimer and Laird Hunt borrow from his practice of improvising on “the facts” of observation to create a work of art, imagining the lives of its characters: stenographer Marge Quinn and her boss, the sometimes painter Abraham Chelikowsky.

The Girl Who Wouldn't Brush Her Hair

release date: Sep 10, 2013
The Girl Who Wouldn't Brush Her Hair
This hilarious, over-the-top story is perfect for any little girl who doesn't like to brush her hair. What happens when our heroine neglects her long tresses? Well, one day a mouse comes to live in a particularly tangled lock. Soon after, more mice move in, and the girl's unruly mop is transformed into a marvelous mouse palace complete with secret passageways and a cheese cellar! But as the girl comes to find out, living with more than a hundred mice atop your head isn't always easy. . . . "This tale will send kids the message that they must take care of their tresses." —Booklist "There are parents who will weep with joy at the prospect of a book that may encourage little Susie or Sam to finally brush that mane." —The Bulletin

The Girl in the Castle Inside the Museum

release date: Dec 19, 2012
The Girl in the Castle Inside the Museum
Once there was a girl who lived in a castle. The castle was inside a museum. When children visited, they’d press against the glass globe in which the castle sat, to glimpse the tiny girl. But when they went home, the girl was lonely. Then one day, she had an idea! What if you hung a picture of yourself inside the castle inside the museum, inside this book? Then you’d able to keep the girl company. Reminiscent of “The Lady of Shalot,” here is an original fairy tale that feels like a dream—haunting, beautiful, and completely unforgettable.

The Lonely Book

release date: Apr 24, 2012
The Lonely Book
When a wonderful new book arrives at the library, at first it is loved by all, checked out constantly, and rarely spends a night on the library shelf. But over time it grows old and worn, and the children lose interest in its story. The book is sent to the library's basement where the other faded books live. How it eventually finds an honored place on a little girl's bookshelf—and in her heart—makes for an unforgettable story sure to enchant anyone who has ever cherished a book. Kate Bernheimer and Chris Sheban have teamed up to create a picture book that promises to be loved every bit as much as the lonely book itself.

Floater

release date: Oct 16, 2013
Floater
In Floater, Kate Bernheimer introduces us to Mike, a girl with a mysterious connection to a recent set of bridge suicides. With taut and lucid prose, we are taken through a day in Mike's life, from dreamless sleep to phone calls with no one on the other end to the usual booth in the diner. Noah Saterstrom's illustrations perfectly complement the quiet melancholy of the story: his frenetic images seem incomplete, unfinished, with conflicting lines and smudges that leave you wondering what might be there, beneath the surface.

Horse, Flower, Bird

release date: Mar 29, 2011
Horse, Flower, Bird
An imaginative, hauntingly poetic collection of contemporary fables that redefine the fairy tale for the modern woman. In Kate Bernheimer’s familiar and spare—yet wondrous—world, an exotic dancer builds her own cage, a wife tends a secret basement menagerie, a fishmonger’s daughter befriends a tulip bulb, and sisters explore cycles of love and violence by reenacting scenes from Star Wars. Enthralling, subtle, and poetic, this collection of eight tales takes readers back to the age-old pleasures of classic fairy tales and makes them new. Their haunting lessons are an evocative reminder that cracking open the door to the imagination is no mere child’s play, and that delight and tragedy lurk in every corner. “Each of these spare and elegant tales rings like a bell in your head. memorable, original, and not much like anything you’ve read.” —Karen Joy Fowler “These stories are the product of a vivid imagination and crafty manipulation by their skillful creator.” —Publishers Weekly “A strange and enchanting book, written in crisp, winning sentences; each story begs to be read aloud and savored.” —Aimee Bender “Horse, Flower, Bird rests uneasily between the intersection of fantasy and reality, dreaming and wakefulness, and the sacred and profane. Like a series of beautiful but troubling dreams, this book will linger long in the memory. Kate Bernheimer is reinventing the fairy tale.” —Peter Buck, R.E.M. “Quirky, twisted. . . . Quietly unhinged narratives by an author who reinvents the fairy tale.” —Kirkus Reviews “[Bernheimer’s] strangely moving stories, such as the eight collected in Horse, Flower, Bird, combine fantasy with deep wisdom; the illustrations by Rikki Ducornet are an added delight.” —Reader’s Digest “Imaginative. . . . Lean and lyrical writing. . . . Bernheimer’s passion for fairy tales is evident in every story she spins.” —Library Journal

The Complete Tales of Lucy Gold

release date: Mar 07, 2011
The Complete Tales of Lucy Gold
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 As a child, Lucy dreams of talking fairies and lives contentedly in the wooded suburbs of Boston; she grows up to be a successful animator of fairy-tale films. Or does she? She claims at moments to be a witch in the woods. Like her sisters, who appeared in Bernheimer’s first two novels (The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold and The Complete Tales of Merry Gold), Lucy has a secret, but she is unable to fasten onto anything but brightness. Novelist Donna Tartt writes, “Lucy’s particular brand of optimism, blind to its own shadow, is very American—she is innocence holding itself apart so fastidiously that it becomes its opposite.” This novel is a perfect end to the Gold family series, and the perfect introduction, for new readers, to Bernheimer’s enchanting body of work.

The Complete Tales of Merry Gold

release date: Jan 01, 2006
The Complete Tales of Merry Gold
A sequel to The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold, the novel follows Merry from her suburban childhood through design school and a whirlwind of lovers, and into a desolate adulthood. Beginning with a toy seal and ending with mushrooms, this fairy tale set in modern times creeps through cruelty and violence to its inevitable end.

The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold

release date: Jan 01, 2001
The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold
The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold is a lavishly poetic novel that recounts through folklore and fairy stories the visionary obsessions of a passionate young woman. The narrative moves freely through time and space, uniting Ketzia Gold's early childhood with her sexual awakenings, creating a dreamscape of haunting vividness. Young Ketzia inhabits a storybook world of hallucinatory comedy and terror, surrounded by predatory adults, talking magnolias, and troll-like siblings. Her childhood romance with talented, brilliant Adam Brown flowers briefly into a marriage of tenderness and erotic fervor, but Ketzia cannot escape her own intelligence, and soon finds herself compelled toward intoxicating self-destruction. Bernheimer draws upon the motifs of traditional German, Russian and Yiddish folklore to shape Ketzia's bewildering adventures. This meeting of nursery rhyme and nightmare transforms everyday objects as childhood photos, wine bottles and metal trinkets take on a life of their own, eluding Ketzia's frightened grasp. Marked by a logical illogic and disarmingly sane madness, this haunting and innovative fable creates an emotional landscape that's as impossible to escape as it is for young Ketzia to inhabit. With an obsessive lyricism recalling the poetic fictions of Carol Maso, Kate Bernheimer interweaves hypnotic imagery and everyday life, moving back and forth through time, piecing together the fragments of memory and imagination. The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold embroiders a visionary realism in the manner of Doris Lessing and Clarice Lispector, making Bernheimer's story a rich tapestry, patterned after childhood longings and the luxuriant complexity of womanhood.
13 results found


  • Aboutread.com makes it one-click away to discover great books from local library by linking books/movies to your library catalog search.

  • Copyright © 2022 Aboutread.com