Best Selling Books by Sheryl Sandberg

Sheryl Sandberg is the author of On the Heels of Desire (2009), Grain Production and Consumption for Feed in the North Central and Southern States with Projections for 1985, 1990, and 2000 (1980), The Historical Development of China's Medical System (1987), Ratio Analysis Workbook (1984) and other 50 books.

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On the Heels of Desire

release date: Nov 01, 2009
On the Heels of Desire
In the early l930s the country is in the midst of a depression and Prohibition is the law. Stewart Connor, a young lawyer, has come to Fort Benton, Montana to go into law practice with F.E. Stranahan, a local attorney. With him have come his wife and his two young sons, Ronald and Robert, (Roscoe and Tooey). Not yet acquainted with any of the young people of the town, the boys make friends with Pete McCall, the elderly caretaker of the fairgrounds. When Pete''s old mare dies, after giving birth to twin foals, Roscoe and Tooey persuade him to let them raise the young fillies. Two years later, because of tragic circumstances, they are faced with having to sell their now well-trained mares and return to the city. Desperate to stay in Montana, the boys decide to run away with their horses. What follows is an adventure, narrated by Roscoe, describing how he and his brother come to be the heroes of the 4th of July Parade.

Grain Production and Consumption for Feed in the North Central and Southern States with Projections for 1985, 1990, and 2000

The Historical Development of China's Medical System

release date: Jan 01, 1987

Ratio Analysis Workbook

release date: Jan 01, 1984

Foreign Language in the Elementary Classroom

release date: Jan 01, 1992

The Influence of Eastern Thought in the Dance of Erick Hawkins

Family Dynamics in the Deployment of Military Personnel

release date: Jan 01, 2003

An Analysis of the Results of Florida's Use Law Program with Suggested Implications for Legislatively Directed Social Change Programs

A Profession in Crisis

release date: Jan 01, 1994

Effects of Anesthesia on Central Auditory Processing

release date: Jan 01, 2001

Health and Nutrition Education at the Pocatello Free Clinic

Health and Nutrition Education at the Pocatello Free Clinic
This project consisted of producing two pamphlets for use by the Pocatello Free Clinic, Pocatello, Idaho. The first pamphlet emphasized four key behaviors highlighted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention necessary for living and healthier life. The second pamphlet highlights a few of the many benefits of exercise.

A Study of the Effect of String-orchestra Repertoire on the Quality of the Intermediate School String Orchestra Program

release date: Jan 01, 1990

The Relationship of Ankle Function to Dynamic Gait Characteristics in Older Adults

release date: Jan 01, 1992

Using Computer Graphics Capabilities to Motivate Significant Theorems and Concepts in Differential Calculus

release date: Jan 01, 1987

Alphabetic Method of Teaching Keyboarding

release date: Jan 01, 1990

The Relationship Between Alexithymia and Lower Socioeconomic Stats of African Americans (UMI-AAT-NR25109).

release date: Jan 01, 2006

The Nature and Scope of Curricular Roles and Responsibilities of Elementary Principals

release date: Jan 01, 1995

Application of Prompting and Incentive Procedures to Promote Safety Belt Usage at a Fast Food Restaurant

release date: Jan 01, 1985

Patient Education, Information Seeking, and Uncertainty in Women Diagnosed with Brest Cancer

release date: Jan 01, 1995

Graduation Policies for Students with Disabilities Who Participate in States' General Assessments. Synthesis Report 98

release date: Jan 01, 2015
Graduation Policies for Students with Disabilities Who Participate in States' General Assessments. Synthesis Report 98
Graduation requirements and diploma options for students with disabilities who participate in the general assessment has been a topic of interest for many years. The recent push for all students, including those with disabilities, to leave school ready for college and career has heightened the importance of understanding what states are requiring of students with disabilities to earn a regular diploma. This investigation explored states'' 2014-15 requirements for those students with disabilities who participate in the general assessment to earn a regular diploma, and compared the requirements held for them to the requirements held for their peers. The authors examined both the course requirements and, in those states that had them, the exit assessment requirements. Overall, they found that only 14 states held the same graduation requirements for their students with disabilities and their peers. Nine of these states had only course requirements for graduation with a regular diploma, and five of them had both course requirements and exit assessment requirements. When looking at course requirements only, 30 of the 51 states had requirements for their students with disabilities that were not the same as those for their peers. When looking at exit assessment requirements only, 19 of the 27 states held less rigorous requirements for their students with disabilities compared to their peers. Continued attention needs to be given to the graduation requirements for all students, but particularly those students with disabilities who participate in states'' general assessments. This attention also must address meeting their instructional needs, and providing appropriate access and accommodations. Appended to the report are: (1) State Resources on Graduation Requirements; (2) Alabama Graduation Requirements for Students Earning a Regular Diploma; (3) State Course Requirements for Graduation with a Regular Diploma; and (4) State Exit Assessments Requirements for Graduation with a Regular Diploma.

How Students Access Accommodations in Assessment and Instruction

release date: Jan 01, 2006
How Students Access Accommodations in Assessment and Instruction
Historically many students with disabilities did not participate in accountability systems. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires that students in all targeted subgroups, including students with disabilities, have the opportunity to learn challenging material that is linked to content standards and to participate in statewide assessments. Some students with disabilities need to use accommodations to meaningfully access instruction and assessment, but little is known about how teachers choose and use accommodations for students with disabilities. This Issue Brief reports the results of a survey of 798 special education teachers in six school districts in four states about the use of student accommodations. The survey was conducted to provide researchers and policymakers with a better understanding of: (1) Which factors influence IEP team decisions about how accommodations are used for instruction and assessment; (2) Which accommodations are most commonly used in instruction and assessment; and (3) The processes used to ensure that assessment accommodations are provided on test day. (Contains 11 tables.).

ICT Adoption by Jamaican SMES

release date: Jan 01, 2007

States' Flexibility Waiver Plans for Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). Synthesis Report 96

release date: Jan 01, 2014
States' Flexibility Waiver Plans for Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). Synthesis Report 96
All states have alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. For accountability purposes, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) allows up to 1% of students to be counted as proficient with this assessment option. In 2011 the U.S. Department of Education provided the opportunity for states to request flexibility from some of the ESEA accountability requirements. The states'' waiver applications included information that pertained to the AA-AAS, alternate achievement standards, and the students with disabilities who participate in the AA-AAS. This report compiles, analyzes, and summarizes what the states said about the AA-AAS in their applications. Key findings include: (1) Three quarters of the states included information about the technical assistance that would be provided to address the AA-AAS; (2) About half of the states included information about how data for students who participated in the AA-AAS would be included with data from the general assessment in the calculation of annual measurable objectives (AMOs), for accountability and for reporting purposes; and (3) About half of the states indicated that they planned to involve stakeholders as they developed and implemented new alternate assessment systems. The flexibility waivers provided states with an opportunity to develop plans that have the potential to improve student learning and outcomes for all students, including students who participate in the AA-AAS. Some states that belonged to one of the two AA-AAS assessment consortia funded by the Office of Special Education Programs--Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM) and National Center and State Collaborative (NCSC)--included information about consortium plans in their applications; several of these states no longer belong to a consortium. There may be a need for these states and the U.S. Department of Education to revisit what the states said about their plans related to the AA-AAS and the students who participate in them to help ensure that the instructional and assessment needs of this population are being met. Appended are (1) State Documents Used in Analysis; and (2) AA-AAS Characteristics by State.

Graduation Policies for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities Who Participate in States' AA-AAS. Synthesis Report 97

release date: Jan 01, 2014
Graduation Policies for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities Who Participate in States' AA-AAS. Synthesis Report 97
Graduation rates and requirements for earning a regular diploma are topics of increasing interest as states focus on ensuring that their students are college and career ready when they leave school with a diploma. To ensure that states are gauging the rates at which students are graduating in a consistent way, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) now requires states to report a four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate (ACGR) overall and by subgroups, including students with disabilities who have Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). Recently, attention has turned to students with disabilities who participate in states'' alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS). It is less clear whether these students are permitted to earn regular high school diplomas when they leave school, and how they might factor into the ACGR calculations. The purpose of this analysis of states'' graduation policies for their students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who participate in the AA-AAS was to address six questions: (1) To what extent do states allow students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who participate in the AA-AAS to earn a regular high school diploma? (2) What are the requirements for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities to earn a regular diploma in those states that do allow them to earn a regular diploma if they participate in the AA-AAS? (3) What end-of-school documents are available to students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who participate in the AA-AAS in states that allow them to earn a regular diploma if they do not meet the requirements for earning a regular diploma? (4) What are the requirements for receiving other end-of-school documents in states that allow students who participate in the AA-AAS to earn a regular diploma? (5) What end-of-school documents are available to students with the most significant cognitive disabilities in states that do not allow them to earn a regular diploma if they participate in the AA-AAS? and (6) What are the requirements for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who participate in the AA-AAS to receive other end-of-school documents when a regular diploma is not offered to them? The following are appended: (1) State Documents Used in Analysis of Accommodation Policies; (2) Example State Profile of One State; (3) States Allowing Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities Who Participate in the AA-AAS to Receive a Regular Diploma and the Criteria for Receiving the Diploma; (4) End-of-School Documents Available to Students Who Do Not Meet Regular Diploma Criteria (in States that Allow Students Participating in the AA-AAS to Receive a Regular Diploma) (N = 34); (5) End-of-School Documents Available to Students in States That Do Not Allow Students Participating in the AA-AAS to Receive a Regular Diploma (N = 16); and (6) Additional Findings About Graduation Requirements for Students Who Participate in States'' AA-AAS.

The Role of Accommodations in Educational Accountability Systems. Topical Review Eight

release date: Jan 01, 2005
The Role of Accommodations in Educational Accountability Systems. Topical Review Eight
Many students with disabilities need to use accommodations to meaningfully access instruction and to be appropriately assessed. During the past decade, the use of assessment accommodations has dramatically increased the participation rates of students with disabilities in statewide testing. Assessment accommodations can be defined as "changes in materials used for testing" (Thurlow, Elliott, & Ysseldyke, 2003, p. 30). The purpose of this topical review is to analyze how accommodations are used by students with disabilities on statewide tests, and their implications for accountability systems. This topical review also analyzes the state accommodations policies in four core states in which the Educational Policy Reform Research Institute (EPRRI) is conducting research (California, Maryland, New York, and Texas) to illustrate a range of accommodation policies. Participation and Accommodation Definitions is appended. (Contains 13 tables and 1 figure.).

Graphic Organizers

release date: Jan 01, 2000
Graphic Organizers
A resource booklet designed to help teachers create and utilize graphic organizers in their classrooms. Graphic organizers are visual representations that help students clarify and understand important concepts. Graphic organizers are designed to help pupils organize their information to aid in the learning process.

Professional Development to Improve Accommodations Decisions

release date: Jan 01, 2011
Professional Development to Improve Accommodations Decisions
Teachers play an important role in making decisions about students'' accommodations for instruction and assessment. Although teachers are a significant part of the decision-making process, "gaps" in teachers'' accommodations knowledge are well documented. Some of these gaps may be due to challenges in providing teacher professional development, including teachers'' limited time. A possible solution is to provide online professional development for teachers. Online training has the potential to avoid some of the pitfalls of traditional professional development, which require participants to meet at the same place and time. Because teachers are likely to have Internet access at work and at home, there is greater flexibility in how the training is provided when it is online. The National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) is developing online training for the state of Alabama. In preparation for this development, the authors conducted a review of the literature to learn more about the characteristics of high-quality online accommodations training. This report summarizes the research literature for both professional development on accommodations decision making, and traditional and high-quality online teacher professional development. [This report was funded with partial support from the Multi-state GSEG Toward a Defensible AA-MAS.].

Computer-Based Testing

release date: Jan 01, 2010
Computer-Based Testing
Computer-based testing (CBT) has emerged as one of the recent "innovative" approaches to assessments most pursued by states. CBT is lauded as the answer to having cheaper and speedier test delivery for state and district-wide assessments. It is also seen by some as an avenue toward greater accessibility for students with disabilities. In this report the authors explore the context of CBT, current state computer-based tests, and considerations for students with disabilities, in part as follow-up to a similar exploration that occurred in the early 2000s when just a few states were beginning to develop and implement CBT for their state assessments. Nine considerations for states and districts are presented: (1) Consider the assumptions and beliefs of various stakeholders about computer-based instruction and assessments; (2) Consider the system as a whole, from the computer infrastructure to classroom and instructional experiences with computers before deciding whether and how to use CBT; (3) Consider the computer or online platform first, with input from individuals who know students with disabilities and their accessibility needs; (4) Consider a process for bringing in the needed expertise to delineate the specific accessibility features of CBT, and to determine what specific accommodations may still be needed by students with disabilities, as well as to determine whether a computer-based test may create new accessibility issues; (5) Determine the policies for which accessibility features will be available to all students and which are designated for specific groups of students, such as students with disabilities; (6) Consider how to track the use of accessibility features incorporated into CBT design; (7) Field test the accessibility features of the computer-based test at the same time that the computer-based test is field tested; (8) Examine results from CBT for students with disabilities to determine whether there are any features or characteristics of the assessment that might need reconsideration; and (9) Develop training for teachers and students to ensure that students benefit from accessibility features. Appendices include: (1) Advantages and Challenges of Computer-based Tests (CBTs); (2) Computer-based Tests: Specifications and Details; and (3) Web Sites used in Analysis of States'' Computer-based Tests. (Contains 1 figure and 9 tables.).

Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

release date: Jan 01, 2011
Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58
This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors'' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations. Data were examined for school years 2006-07 through 2009-10. Because most states had not yet reported data for 2009-10, the authors focused most of their analyses on 2006-07 (six states with an AA-MAS), 2007-08 (eight states with an AA-MAS), and 2008-09 (eight states with an AA-MAS). Their analysis of AA-MAS participation and performance reporting indicated that most states implementing these assessments were reporting some data publicly. For participation data across years, seven states reported participation data by grade. Most of these states reported numbers of students tested; a few states reported the percent of students tested on the AA-MAS. Three appendices are included. (Contains 13 tables and 12 figures.).

2015-16 High School Assessment Accommodations Policies

release date: Jan 01, 2016
2015-16 High School Assessment Accommodations Policies
During the 2015-16 school year, 25 states used assessments aligned to college- and career-ready standards developed by consortia of states (i.e., Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers--PARCC, Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium--Smarter Balanced) as their accountability assessments. The participation of students with disabilities in all state- and district-administered assessments is required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which also requires that they be provided accommodations as appropriate. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) confirms the participation requirements for students with disabilities and adds requirements for the participation of English learners (ELs) in state-administered assessments. With the reauthorization of ESEA in 2015, IDEA requirements for reporting on the number of students using accommodations was confirmed; the reauthorization added the requirement that accommodations be provided to ELs for both content and English Language Proficiency (ELP) assessments. This report provides a snapshot of how accommodations were included in policies across ACT, SAT, PARCC, and Smarter Balanced during the 2015-16 school year. Data for this analysis were obtained through the examination and analysis of publicly available information, including accommodations manuals and other policy documents. There was wide variation in the accessibility and accommodations policies of ACT, SAT, PARCC, and Smarter Balanced in 2015-16. The results of the analysis are organized as follows: (1) the accessibility and accommodations approach of each assessment; (2) a crosswalk of the approaches of the assessments; and (3) the specific accommodations that were allowed for each of the assessments. This analysis strongly indicates that there is a need for more research. The following are appended: (1) Documents Used in Analysis; (2) Documentation Requirements; and (3) Specific Accommodations.

Research Productivity of the State Agricultural Experiment Station System

A Principled Approach to Accountability Assessments for Students with Disabilities. Synthesis Report 70

release date: Jan 01, 2008
A Principled Approach to Accountability Assessments for Students with Disabilities. Synthesis Report 70
Building on research and practice, the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) has revisited and updated its 2001 document that identified principles and characteristics that underlie inclusive assessment and accountability systems. This report on a principled approach to accountability assessments for students with disabilities reflects lessons learned during the past seven years, presenting six core principles: (1) All students are included in ways that hold schools accountable for their learning; (2) Assessments allow all students to show their knowledge and skills on the same content; (3) High quality decision making determines how students participate; (4) Public reporting includes the assessment results of all students; (5) Accountability determinations are affected in the same way by all students; and (6) Continuous improvement, monitoring, and training ensure the quality of the overall system. Rationale and specific characteristics for each principle are included. A List of Groups and Individuals who Provided Review and Comment during Development of the 2008 NCEO Principles is appended. (Contains 1 figure and 6 tables.).
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