Best Selling Children's Books - Literature

Discover best selling children's books - literature from local library. Read book reviews and check book availability from public library with one click.

For more book recommendations, please check out New York Times® Best Sellers, Children's Book Recommendations or the complete list of Featured Book Lists and Award Winners

1 - 40 of 200 results
>>

The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine

by:

Harper's New Monthly Magazine

Harper's New Monthly Magazine
Important American periodical dating back to 1850.

Essays on rhetoric: abridged chiefly from dr. Blair's lectures on that science

Touching, Devotional Practices, and Visionary Experience in the Late Middle Ages

Touching, Devotional Practices, and Visionary Experience in the Late Middle Ages
This book addresses the history of the senses in relation to affective piety and its role in devotional practices in the late Middle Ages, focusing on the sense of touch. It argues that only by deeply analysing this specific context of perception can the full significance of sensory religious experience in the Late Middle Ages be understood. Considering the centrality of the body to medieval society and Christianity, this collection explores a range of devotional practices, mainly relating to the Passion of Christ, and features manuscripts, works of devotional literature, art, woodcuts and judicial records. It brings together a multidisciplinary group of scholars to offer a variety of methodological approaches, in order to understand how touch was encoded, evoked and purposefully used. The book further considers how touch was related to the medieval theory of perception, examining its relation to the inner and outer senses through the eyes of visionaries, mystics, theologians and confessors, not only as praxis but from different theoretical points of view. While considered the most basic of spiritual experience, the chapters in this book highlight the all-pervasive presence of touch and the significance of ‘affective piety’ to Late Medieval Christians. Chapter 3: Drama, Performance and Touch in the Medieval Convent and Beyond is Open Access under a CC BY 4.0 license at link.springer.com

Music and Identity in Twentieth-Century Literature from Our America

release date: Aug 19, 2014
Music and Identity in Twentieth-Century Literature from Our America
Offering a one-of-a-kind approach to music and literature of the Americas, this book examines the relationships between musical protagonists from Colombia, Cuba, and the United States in novels by writers such as Gabriel García Márquez, Alejo Carpentier, Zora Neale Hurston, and John Okada.

University of Wisconsin Studies in Language and Literature

by:

Charles Johnson

release date: Jan 01, 2007
Charles Johnson
Essays by Herman Beavers, Gena Chandler, Marc C. Conner, William Gleason, William R. Nash, Linda Selzer, Gary Storhoff, and John Whalen-Bridge In Charles Johnson: The Novelist as Philosopher, leading scholars examine the African American author''s literary corpus and major themes, ideas, and influences. The essays explore virtually all of Johnson''s writings: each of his novels, his numerous short stories, the range of his nonfiction essays, his many book reviews, and even several unpublished works. These essays engage Johnson''s work from a variety of critical perspectives, revealing the philosophical, cultural, and political implications of his writings. The authors seek especially to understand philosophical black fiction and to provide the multifocal, whole sight analysis Johnson''s work demands. Johnson (b. 1948)--author of Dreamer, Oxherding Tale, and the National Book Award-winning Middle Passage draws upon influences as diverse as Richard Wright, Herman Melville, Thomas Aquinas, Franz Kafka, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. He combines rigorous training in western philosophy with a lifelong practice in eastern religious and philosophical traditions. He has repeatedly told interviewers that he became a writer specifically to strengthen the interplay between philosophy and fiction. Marc C. Conner is associate professor of English at Washington and Lee University. William R. Nash is associate professor of American studies and director of African American studies at Middlebury College.

The Mystery of Education, and Other Academic Performances

Stories from the Classic Literature of Many Nations

Place Names

release date: Jan 01, 2007
Place Names
Which came first, words or things? Are your words yours, or someone elses? And what do the Crusades have to do with it? And what do ants have to do with it? Jean Ricardou has been given something of a bad rap: hes widely seen as a difficult writer, or worse yet, as an intensely serious one. However, he easily sheds this weighty reputation in his hilariously playful new novel about the notoriously complex world of literary theory. Supplying his readers with everything they need to know to navigate this world, Ricardou uses his own irreverent interpretation of deconstructive theory to ask questions about language and history, theory and life, and all the intriguing connections between them. "With remarkable mastery, Jean Ricardou creates a fiction, like those of Borges, causes the conventional foundations of reality to tremble, and that brings with it, through its infinitely reflected simulacra, the collapse of reason beneath the vestiges of a question with no answer."-Alain Clerval "Ingenious, facetious, . . . and skillfully constructed, it offers its readers the discovery, at once surprising and captivating, of a love affair, conceived in the arcane of language, between narration and fiction, and--why not?--between dreams and realities."-Andr Dalmas "[Because] of its extreme eccentricity, Ricardous work sets its own traditions far from the more familiar forms of postmodern fiction." -Tobin Jones "[Place Names] must be read and experienced rather than talked about."-Leon S. Roudiez

The Nun

release date: Apr 14, 2005
The Nun
"This novel takes the life of a young girl forced by her parents to enter a convent as its subject matter and provides an insight into the effects of forced vocations"--Provided by publisher.

The Noir Thriller

release date: Jan 03, 2016
The Noir Thriller
What is literary noir? How do British and American noir thrillers relate to their historical contexts? In considering such questions, this study ranges over hundreds of novels, analysing the politics and poetics of noir from the hard-boiled fiction of Hammett, Chandler and Cain to the exciting diversity of nineties thrillers, with sections on the tough investigators, gangsters and victims of the Depression years: the first-person killers, femmes fatales and black protagonists of mid-century; the game-players, voyeurs and consumers of contemporary thrillers and future noir.

The Event

release date: Jan 01, 2015
The Event
What is an event? From a philosophical perspective, events are irregular occurrences—moments of change and interruption—categorized by human perception, language, and thought. While philosophers have pored over the subject of events extensively in recent years, The Event: Literature and Theory seeks to ground it: What is literature’s approach to the event? How does literature produce and give testimony to events? Ilai Rowner’s study not only revisits some of the most important thinkers of our time, including Maurice Blanchot, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, and Martin Heidegger, it also develops a critical approach to literature that questions the meaning of the literary event through examinations of literary works by Marcel Proust, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, and T. S. Eliot. Rowner offers a new method of thinking about the particular characteristics of the event within literary works and defines the creative value of literature as the aspiration toward the un-happening within the happening. In this study the experience of literature—as an act of both writing and reading—becomes the struggle to capture the excessive movement of the event while also revealing the creative energy within that work of literature.

Modernization and the Crisis of Memory

release date: Jan 01, 2002
Modernization and the Crisis of Memory
Contemporary studies of memory focus either on the psychology of remembering, on its archives and media, or on the traditional ars memoriae. The general cultural framework with its social and material factors is largely neglected, despite the obvious impact on both collective and individual mnemonic mentality. But, as in the first half of the seventeenth century or the later twentieth century, the literary and political invocation of religious, collective or national memory occurs most of all in times of historical rupture, and attendant changes of a radical technological and cultural nature. Appeals to the power of memory are not only indicative of the anxiety about the loss of its binding or absolving character. They are already symptomatic of a deep crisis of cultural memory in itself, resulting from an erosion of firm spatial, temporal and historical references along with an increasing tendency towards reflexivity, which calls the apparently self-evident facts of past and present into question. The continuity of remembering, however, as this study argues, presupposes the permanence and recurrence of social and material relations, of representative or symbolic persons, objects and events, in which it can inscribe itself. But owing to the shift in historical consciousness from (typological) past to progressive future and novelty and under the impress of industrial production and modern media (mobility and communications), the Western subject has to cope constantly with new empirical situations, symbolic values and historical or current information whose origin and evolution - indeed, the very memory of them - remain alien to personal identity and memory. The promise of redemption and salvation, still inherent in seventeenth-century collective memory, loses credibility. The study includes a wide range of authors from Donne to Pope, Tennyson to George Eliot and Walter Pater, W.B. Yeats to Don DeLillo and covers the whole period from early modern England to postmodernism. It can thus also be read as a brief history of Western memory and its continuing crises.

Literary Meaning

release date: Jan 01, 1998
Literary Meaning
"In this clearly written and accessible book, (Wendell) Harris sets out to expose the inadequacies of current methods and trends in literary criticism. . . . The book''s greatest strength is its lucid presentation of critical works, which are then shown to be compromised by fallacies and flaws".-- CHOICE.
1 - 40 of 200 results
>>


  • Aboutread.com makes it one-click away to discover great books from local library by linking books/movies to your library catalog search.

  • Copyright © 2022 Aboutread.com