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Text and Image in Women's Life Writing

release date: Feb 11, 2022
Text and Image in Women's Life Writing
This book examines the relationship between words and images in various life-writing works produced by nineteenth to twenty-first century American and British women. It addresses the politics of images in women’s life writing, contending that the presence or absence of images is often strategic. Including a range of different forms of life writing, chapters draw on traditional (auto)biographies, travel narratives, memoirs, diaries, autofiction, cancer narratives, graphic memoirs, artistic installations, quilts and online performances, as life writing moves from page to screen and other media. The book explores a wide range of women who have crossed the boundary between text and image: painters who have become writers, novelists who have become painters, writers who hesitate between images and words, models who seize the camera, and artists who use the frame as a page.

Modernist Idealism

release date: Nov 11, 2021
Modernist Idealism
Modernist Idealism develops a framework for understanding modernist production as the artistic realization of philosophical concepts elaborated in German idealism.

Bitstreams

release date: Oct 08, 2021
Bitstreams
In Bitstreams, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum distills twenty years of thinking about the intersection of digital media, textual studies, and literary archives to argue that bits--the ubiquitous ones and zeros of computing-- always depend on the material world that surrounds them to form the bulwark for preserving the future of literary heritage.

Reception of Northrop Frye

by:
release date: Sep 23, 2021
Reception of Northrop Frye
The Reception of Northrup Frye takes a thorough accounting of the presence of Frye in existing works and argues against Frye''s diminishing status as an important critical voice.

The Legacies of Ursula K. Le Guin

release date: Oct 21, 2021
The Legacies of Ursula K. Le Guin
The Legacies of Ursula K. Le Guin explores how Le Guin’s fiction and essays have built a speculative ethical practice engaging indigenous knowledge and feminism, while crafting utopias in which human and other-than-human life forms enter into new relations. Her work also delineates new ways of making sense of the “science” of science fiction. The authors of this collection provide up-to-date discussions of well-known works as well as more experimental writings. Written in an accessible style, Legacies will appeal to any readers interested in literature, science fiction and fantasy, as well as specialists of science and technology studies, philosophy of science, ethics, gender studies, indigenous studies and posthumanism.

Translating Samuel Beckett around the World

release date: Aug 03, 2021
Translating Samuel Beckett around the World
The global reception of Samuel Beckett raises numerous questions: in which areas of the world was Beckett first translated? Why were Beckett texts sometimes slow to penetrate certain cultures? How were national literatures impacted by Beckett''s oeuvre? Translating Samuel Beckett around the World brings together leading researchers in Beckett studies to discuss these questions and explore the fate of Beckett in their own societies and national languages. The current text provides ample coverage of the presence of Beckett in geographical contexts normally ignored by literary criticism, and reveals unknown aspects of the 1969 Nobel Prize winner interacting with translators of his work in a number of different countries.

The Knights of Modernism

release date: Jun 07, 2021
The Knights of Modernism
According to the customary literary-historical and theoretical notion, the fact that the first modern novel represents a parody or travesty of the chivalric ideal merits no particular attention. Failing to become attuned to the real role of the chivalric ideal at the beginning of the era of the modern novel, commentators missed the chance to adequately review the role of chivalry at the end of that period. The modern novel did not only begin, but also ended with a travesty of the chivalric ideal. The deep need of a significant number of modernist writers to measure their own time according to the ideals of the high and late Middle Ages cannot, therefore, be explained by a set of literary-historical, spiritual-historical or social circumstances. The predilection of a range of twentieth century novelists for a distant feudal past suggests that there exists a fundamental poetic connection between the modern (or at least the modernist) novel and the ideals of chivalry.

Weird Fiction

release date: Jan 01, 2021
Weird Fiction
Weird Fiction: A Genre Study presents a comprehensive, contemporary analysis of the genre of weird fiction by identifying the concepts that influence and produce it. Focusing on the sources of narrative content--how the content is produced and what makes something weird--Michael Cisco engages with theories from Deleuze and Guattari to explain how genres work and to understand the relationship between identity and the ordinary. Cisco also uses these theories to examine the supernatural not merely as a horde of tropes, but as a recognition of the infinity of experience in defiance of limiting norms. The book also traces the sociopolitical implications of weird fiction, studying the differentiation of major and minor literatures. Through an articulated theoretical model and close textual analysis, readers will learn not only what weird fiction is, but how and why it is produced.

Food Culture Studies in India

release date: Dec 18, 2020
Food Culture Studies in India
This book discusses food in the context of the cultural matrix of India. Addressing topical issues in food and food culture, it explores questions concerning the consumption, representation and mediation of food. The book is divided into four sections, focusing on food fads; food representation; the symbolic valence of food; modes and manners of resistance articulated through food. Investigating consumption practices in both public and ethnic culture, each chapter introduces a fresh approach to food across diverse literary and cultural genres. The book offers a highly readable guide for researchers and practitioners in the field of literary and cultural studies, as well as the sociological fields of food studies, body studies and fat studies.

Postcolonial Modernity and the Indian Novel

release date: May 27, 2020
Postcolonial Modernity and the Indian Novel
This book argues that modernity in postcolonial India has been synonymous with catastrophe and crisis. Focusing on the literary works of the 1943 Bengal Famine, the 1967–72 Naxalbari Movement, and the 1975–77 Indian Emergency, it shows that there is a long-term, colonially-engineered agrarian crisis enabling these catastrophic events. Novelists such as Bhabani Bhattacharya, Mahasweta Devi, Salman Rushdie, Rohinton Mistry, Nabarun Bhattacharya, and Nayantara Sahgal, among others, have captured the relationship between the long-term crisis and the catastrophic aspects of the events through different aesthetic modalities within realism, ranging from analytical-affective, critical realist, quest modes to apparently non-realist ones such as metafictional, urban fantastic, magical realist, and others. These realist modalities are together read here as postcolonial catastrophic realism.

Childhood in Contemporary Diasporic African Literature

release date: Feb 27, 2020
Childhood in Contemporary Diasporic African Literature
This book examines the representation of figures, memories and images of childhood in selected contemporary diasporic African fiction by Adichie, Abani, Wainaina and Oyeyemi. The book argues that childhood is a key framework for thinking about contemporary African and African Diasporic identities. It argues that through the privileging of childhood memory, alternative conceptions of time emerge in this literature, and which allow African writers to re-imagine what family, ethnicity, nation means within the new spaces of diaspora that a majority of them occupy. The book therefore looks at the connections between childhood, space, time and memory, childhood gender and sexuality, childhoods in contexts of war, as well as migrant childhoods. These dimensions of childhood particularly relate to the return of the memory of Biafra, the figures of child soldiers, memories of growing up in Cold War Africa, queer boyhoods/sonhood as well as experiences of migration within Africa, North America and Europe.

Literature, Spoken Language and Speaking Skills in Second Language Learning

release date: Nov 07, 2019
Literature, Spoken Language and Speaking Skills in Second Language Learning
Explores how literature is used as a model of spoken language and to develop speaking skills in second language learning.

Communism and Poetry

release date: Jul 12, 2019
Communism and Poetry
Communism and Poetry: Writing Against Capital addresses the relationship between an upsurge in collective political practice around the world since 2000, and the crystallization of newly engaged forms of poetry. Considering an array of perspectives—poets, poet-critics, activists and theorists—these essays shed new light on the active interface between emancipatory political thought and poetic production and explore how poetry and the new communism are creating mutually innovative forms of thought and activity, supercharging the utopian imagination. Drawing inspiration from past connections between communism and poetry, and theorizing new directions over the years ahead, the volume models a much-needed critical solidarity with creative strategies in the present conjuncture to activate movements of resistance, on the streets and in verse.

Postcolonial Literatures in English

release date: Apr 27, 2019
Postcolonial Literatures in English
The term ‘postcolonial literatures in English’ designates English-language literatures from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania, as well as the literatures of diasporic communities who have moved from those regions to the global north. This volume introduces the central themes of postcolonial literary studies and delineates how these themes are reflected and elaborated in exemplary literary works by postcolonial authors from around the world. It also offers succinct definitions of key terms like Orientalism, hybridity, Indigeneity or writing back.

Illuminations

release date: Jan 01, 2019
Illuminations
Views from one of the most original cultural critics of the twentieth century, Walter Benjamin

The Cambridge Companion to World Literature

release date: Oct 31, 2018
The Cambridge Companion to World Literature
This Companion presents lucid and exemplary critical essays, introducing readers to the major ideas and practices of world literary studies.

British Prose Poetry

release date: Jul 04, 2018
British Prose Poetry
This book is the first collection of essays on the British prose poem. With essays by leading academics, critics and practitioners, the book traces the British prose poem’s unsettled history and reception in the UK as well as its recent popularity. The essays cover the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries exploring why this form is particularly suited to the modern age and yet can still be problematic for publishers, booksellers and scholars. Refreshing perspectives are given on the Romantics, Modernists and Post-Modernists, among them Woolf, Beckett and Eliot as well as more recent poets like Seamus Heaney, Geoffrey Hill, Claudia Rankine, Jeremy Over and Vahni Capildeo. British Prose Poetry moves from a contextual overview of the genre’s early volatile and fluctuating status, through to crucial examples of prose poetry written by established Modernist, surrealist and contemporary writers. Key questions around boundaries are discussed more generally in terms of race, class and gender. The British prose poem’s international heritage, influences and influence are explored throughout as an intrinsic part of its current renaissance.

Liminality, Hybridity, and American Women's Literature

release date: May 04, 2018
Liminality, Hybridity, and American Women's Literature
This book highlights the multiplicity of American women’s writing related to liminality and hybridity from its beginnings to the contemporary moment. Often informed by notions of crossing, intersectionality, transition, and transformation, these concepts as they appear in American women’s writing contest as well as perpetuate exclusionary practices involving class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sex, among other variables. The collection’s introduction, three unit introductions, fourteen individual essays, and afterward facilitate a process of encounters, engagements, and conversations within, between, among, and across the rich polyphony that constitutes the creative acts of American women writers. The contributors offer fresh perspectives on canonical writers as well as introduce readers to new authors. As a whole, the collection demonstrates American women’s writing is “threshold writing,” or writing that occupies a liminal, hybrid space that both delimits borders and offers enticing openings.

Comparative Literature: a Very Short Introduction

release date: Mar 22, 2018
Comparative Literature: a Very Short Introduction
Comparative Literature is both the past and the future of literary studies. Its history is intimately linked to the political upheavals of modernity: from colonial empire-building in the nineteenth century, via the Jewish diaspora of the twentieth century, to the postcolonial culture wars ofthe twenty-first century, attempts at "comparison" have defined the international agenda of literature. But what is comparative literature? Ambitious readers looking to stretch themselves are usually intrigued by the concept, but uncertain of its implications. And rightly so, in many ways: even theprofessionals cannot agree on a single term, calling it comparative in English, compared in French, and comparing in German. The very term itself, when approached comparatively, opens up a Pandora''s box of cultural differences. Yet this, in a nutshell, is the whole point of comparative literature. To look at literature comparatively is to realize just how much can be learned by looking over the horizon of one''s own culture; it is to discover not only more about other literatures, but also about one''s own; and it is toparticipate in the great utopian dream of understanding the way nations and languages interact. In an age that is paradoxically defined by migration and border crossing on the one hand, and by a retreat into monolingualism and monoculturalism on the other, the cross-cultural agenda of comparativeliterature has become increasingly central to the future of the Humanities. We are all, in fact, comparatists, constantly making connections across languages, cultures, and genres as we read. The question is whether we realise it.This Very Short Introduction tells the story of Comparative Literature as an agent of international relations, from the point of view both of scholarship and of cultural history more generally. Outlining the complex history and competing theories of comparative literature, Ben Hutchinson offers anaccessible means of entry into a notoriously slippery subject, and shows how comparative literature can be like a Rorschach test, where people see in it what they want to see. Ultimately, Hutchinson places comparative literature at the very heart of literary criticism, for as George Steiner oncenoted, ''to read is to compare''.ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, andenthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Videogames and Postcolonialism

release date: Jul 24, 2017
Videogames and Postcolonialism
This book focuses on the almost entirely neglected treatment of empire and colonialism in videogames. From its inception in the nineties, Game Studies has kept away from these issues despite the early popularity of videogame franchises such as Civilization and Age of Empire. This book examines the complex ways in which some videogames construct conceptions of spatiality, political systems, ethics and society that are often deeply imbued with colonialism. Moving beyond questions pertaining to European and American gaming cultures, this book addresses issues that relate to a global audience – including, especially, the millions who play videogames in the formerly colonised countries, seeking to make a timely intervention by creating a larger awareness of global cultural issues in videogame research. Addressing a major gap in Game Studies research, this book will connect to discourses of post-colonial theory at large and thereby, provide another entry-point for this new medium of digital communication into larger Humanities discourses.

Irony and the Ironic

release date: Jul 06, 2017
Irony and the Ironic
First published in 1970 and revised in 1982, this work provides a critical overview of the concept of irony in literary criticism. After establishing the relationship of the ironical and the non-ironical, it summarises the history of the concept of irony, before isolating and discussing its basic aspects and the variable features that determine its nature, effect and quality. The book will be a useful resource for those studying irony and English Literature.

Postcolonialism and Postsocialism in Fiction and Art

release date: Feb 08, 2017
Postcolonialism and Postsocialism in Fiction and Art
This book tackles the intersections of postcolonial and postsocialist imaginaries and sensibilities focusing on the ways they are reflected in contemporary art, fiction, theater and cinema. After the defeat of the Socialist modernity the postsocialist space and its people have found themselves in the void. Many elements of the former Second world experience, echo the postcolonial situations, including subalternization, epistemic racism, mimicry, unhomedness and transit, the revival of ethnic nationalisms and neo-imperial narratives, neo-Orientalist and mutant Eurocentric tendencies, indirect forms of resistance and life-asserting modes of re-existence. Yet there are also untranslatable differences between the postcolonial and the postsocialist human conditions. The monograph focuses on the aesthetic principles and mechanisms of sublime, the postsocialist/postcolonial decolonization of museums, the perception and representation of space and time through the tempolocalities of post-dependence, the anatomy of characters-tricksters with shifting multiple identities, the memory politics of the post-traumatic conditions and ways of their overcoming.

A Prehistory of Cognitive Poetics

release date: Jan 01, 2017
A Prehistory of Cognitive Poetics
"Bringing neoclassicism back into today''s critical debates, this study considers the cognitive underpinnings of the rules of poetic justice, the unities and decorum, underlines their relevance for today''s cognitive poetics and traces their influence in the emerging narrative form of the eighteenth-century novel"--

Contemporary Women's Gothic Fiction

release date: Nov 04, 2016
Contemporary Women's Gothic Fiction
This book revives and revitalises the literary Gothic in the hands of contemporary women writers. It makes a scholarly, lively and convincing case that the Gothic makes horror respectable, and establishes contemporary women’s Gothic fictions in and against traditional Gothic. The book provides new, engaging perspectives on established contemporary women Gothic writers, with a particular focus on Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood and Toni Morrison. It explores how the Gothic is malleable in their hands and is used to demythologise oppressions based on difference in gender and ethnicity. The study presents new Gothic work and new nuances, critiques of dangerous complacency and radical questionings of what is safe and conformist in works as diverse as Twilight (Stephenie Meyer) and A Girl Walks Home Alone (Ana Lily Amirpur), as well as by Anne Rice and Poppy Brite. It also introduces and critically explores postcolonial, vampire and neohistorical Gothic and women’s ghost stories.

The Fantasy Literature of England

release date: Jul 27, 2016
The Fantasy Literature of England
In this, the first book on English fantasy, Colin Manlove shows that for all its immense diversity, English Fantasy can best be understood in terms of its strong national character, rather than as an international genre. Showing its development from Beowulf to Blake, the author describes English Fantasy''s modern growth through secondary world, metaphysical, emotive, comic, subversive and children''s fantasy. In them all England has led the world, with authors as different as Chaucer, Lewis Carroll, J.R.R. Tolkien and Salman Rushdie.

The Ecology of Wonder in Romantic and Postmodern Literature

release date: May 06, 2016
The Ecology of Wonder in Romantic and Postmodern Literature
This book traces the aesthetic of wonder from the romantic period through contemporary philosophy and literature, arguing for its relevance to ecological consciousness. Most ecocritical scholarship tends to overshadow discussions of wonder with the sublime, failing to treat these two aesthetic categories as distinct. As a result, contemporary scholarship has conflated wonder and the sublime and ultimately lost the nuances that these two concepts conjure for readers and thinkers. Economides illuminates important differences between these aesthetics, particularly their negotiation of issues relevant to gender-based and environmental politics. In turn, readers can utilize the concept of wonder as an open-ended, non-violent framework in contrast to the ethos of domination that often surrounds the sublime.

Ecstatic Transformation

release date: Apr 30, 2016
Ecstatic Transformation
This book studies the way in which medieval ways of knowing the Oriental ''other'' were constructed around the idea of a utopic East as located in the legend and Letter of Prester John (c. 1160). The birth of utopic thinking, it argues, is tied to an understanding of alterity having as much to do with the ways the medieval West understood itself as the manner in which the foreign was mapped. Drawing upon the insights of cultural studies, film studies, and psychoanalysis, this book rethinks the contours of the known and the unknown in the medieval period. It demonstrates how the idea of otherness intersected in intricate ways with other categories of difference (spatial, gender, and religious). Scholars in the fields of history as well as literary and religious studies will be interested in the manner in which the book considers the formal dimensions of how histories of the Oriental other were written and lived.

Urban Space in Contemporary Egyptian Literature

release date: Apr 30, 2016
Urban Space in Contemporary Egyptian Literature
An examination of how the space of the downtown served dual purposes as both a symbol of colonial influence and capital in Egypt, as well as a staging ground for the demonstrations of the Egyptian nationalist movement.

Weyward Macbeth

release date: Apr 30, 2016
Weyward Macbeth
Weyward Macbeth, a volume of entirely new essays, provides innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the various ways Shakespeare''s ''Macbeth'' has been adapted and appropriated within the context of American racial constructions. Comprehensive in its scope, this collection addresses the enduringly fraught history of ''Macbeth'' in the United States, from its appearance as the first Shakespearean play documented in the American colonies to a proposed Hollywood film version with a black diasporic cast. Over two dozen contributions explore ''Macbeth''s'' haunting presence in American drama, poetry, film, music, history, politics, acting, and directing — all through the intersections of race and performance.

Problems of Canonicity and Identity Formation in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia

release date: Apr 24, 2016
Problems of Canonicity and Identity Formation in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
The term ‘canonicity’ implies the recognition that the domain of literature and of the library is also a cultural and political one, related to various forms of identity formation, maintenance, and change. Scribes and benefactors ‘create’ canon in as much as they teach, analyze, preserve, prom¬ulgate and change ‘canonical’ texts according to prevailing norms. From early on, texts from the written traditions of ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt were accumulated, codified, and to some extent canonized, as various collections developed mainly in the environment of the temple and the palace. These written traditions represent sets of formal and informal cultures that all speak in their own ways of canonicity, normativity, and other forms of cultural expertise. Some forms of literature were used not only in scholarly contexts, but also in political ones, and they served purposes of identity formation. This volume addresses the interrelations between various forms of ‘canon’ and identity formation in different time periods, genres, regions, and contexts, as well as the application of contemporary conceptions of ‘canon’ to ancient texts.

Gatekeepers

release date: Apr 12, 2016
Gatekeepers
The romantic idea of the writer as an isolated genius has been discredited, but there are few empirical studies documenting the role of "gatekeeping" in the literary process. How do friends, agents, editors, translators, small publishers, and reviewers-not to mention the changes in technology and the publishing industry-shape the literary process? This matrix is further complicated when books cross cultural and language barriers, that is, when they become part of World Literature. Gatekeepers builds on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Randall Collins, James English, and Mark McGurl, describing the multi-layered gatekeeping process in the context of World Literature after the 1960s. It focuses on four case studies: Gabriel García Márquez, Charles Bukowski, Paul Auster and Haruki Murakami. The two American authors achieved remarkable success overseas owing to canny gatekeepers; the two international authors benefited tremendously from well-curated translation into English. Rich in archival materials (correspondence between authors, editors, and translators, and publishing industry analyses), interviews with publishers and translators, and close readings of translations, this study shows how the process and production of literature depends on the larger social forces of a given historical moment. William Marling also documents the ever-increasing Anglo-centric dictate on the gatekeeping process. World Literature, the book argues, is not so much a "republic of letters" as a field of chance on which the conversation is partly bracketed by historic events and technological opportunities.

Pindar and the Emergence of Literature

release date: Oct 14, 2015
Pindar and the Emergence of Literature
For much of Western history, Pindar''s work was recognized as the pinnacle of lyric poetry. This book presents an introduction to different aspects of Pindar''s art, while demonstrating its importance for the coming into being of literature as it has been conceived of in the West.

Literary Hermeneutics

release date: Jun 18, 2015
Literary Hermeneutics
This book analyses the most significant aspects of the evolutionary process which occurred in literary hermeneutics: the shift from interpretation perceived as a methodology of reading to the ontological function of exegesis. Through the discussion of the theories of Friedrich Schleiermacher, Eric Donald Hirsch, Hans-Georg Gadamer and Paul Ricoeur, it focuses on the metamorphosis of the concepts of meaning, interpretation and validity, and demonstrates how the correlative changes in the essence and functions of these three elements transformed the art of understanding from being a methodological discipline to an ontological instrument for a re-description of the interpreter’s self. The book highlights the development of those aspects of hermeneutic thought which are of particular significance in the contemporary debate over validity and criteria of interpretation. The vision of hermeneutics proposed here contradicts the supposedly anachronistic character of the art of understanding, and, through a permanent departure from essentialist views and categories, enables it to enter into a discussion with such literary orientations as neo-pragmatism and reader-response theory.

English Blake

release date: May 21, 2015
English Blake
Originally published in 1949, this book presents a study of William Blake''s works and philosophy, focusing particularly on his position in relation to the broader currents of ''English thought''. Illustrative figures and notes are incorporated throughout. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in Blake''s position within the English artistic and literary tradition.

Exquisite Corpse

release date: May 05, 2015
Exquisite Corpse
Zoe unwittingly stumbles into the literary scandal of the century when she befriends an author who faked his death years before in order to make money selling his new works as lost manuscripts.

Relics of Death in Victorian Literature and Culture

release date: Jan 15, 2015
Relics of Death in Victorian Literature and Culture
This literary and cultural study explores the practice in nineteenth-century Britain of treasuring objects that had belonged to the dead.

All for Nothing

release date: Aug 29, 2014
All for Nothing
A specter is haunting philosophy -- the specter of Hamlet. Why is this? Wherefore? What should we do?Entering from stage left: the philosopher''s Hamlet. The philosopher''s Hamlet is a conceptual character, played by philosophers rather than actors. He performs not in the theater but within the space of philosophical positions. In All for Nothing, Andrew Cutrofello critically examines the performance history of this unique role. The philosopher''s Hamlet personifies negativity. In Shakespeare''s play, Hamlet''s speech and action are characteristically negative; he is the melancholy Dane. Most would agree that he has nothing to be cheerful about. Philosophers have taken Hamlet to embody specific forms of negativity that first came into view in modernity. What the figure of the Sophist represented for Plato, Hamlet has represented for modern philosophers. Cutrofello analyzes five aspects of Hamlet''s negativity: his melancholy, negative faith, nihilism, tarrying (which Cutrofello distinguishes from "delaying"), and nonexistence. Along the way, we meet Hamlet in the texts of Kant, Coleridge, Hegel, Marx, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Freud, Russell, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Benjamin, Arendt, Schmitt, Lacan, Deleuze, Foucault, Derrida, Badiou, Žižek, and other philosophers. Whirling across a kingdom of infinite space, the philosopher''s Hamlet is nothing if not thought-provoking.

The Digital Afterlives of Jane Austen

release date: Mar 18, 2014
The Digital Afterlives of Jane Austen
This is the first scholarly study to explore the ever-expanding world of online Austen fandom and fan fiction writing. Using case studies from the Internet writing community and publisher, Wattpad, as well as dedicated fan websites, it illuminates the literary processes and products that have given Austen multiple afterlives in the digital arena.

The Disarticulate

release date: Jan 01, 2014
The Disarticulate
Language is integral to our social being. But what is the status of those who stand outside of language? The mentally disabled, wild children, people with autism and other neurological disorders, as well as animals, infants, angels, and artificial intelligences, have all engaged with language from a position at its borders. In the intricate verbal constructions of modern literature, the OCydisarticulateOCOOCothose at the edges of languageOCohave, paradoxically, played essential, defining roles. Drawing on the disarticulate figures in modern fictional works such asa Billy Budd, The Sound and the Fury, Nightwood, White Noise, aanda The Echo Maker, aamong others, James Berger shows in this intellectually bracing study how these characters mark sites at which aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, political, medical, and scientific discourses converge. It is also the place of the greatest ethical tension, as society confronts the needs and desires of the least of its brothers. Berger argues that the disarticulate is that which is unaccountable in the discourses of modernity and thus stands as an alternative to the prevailing social order. Using literary history and theory, as well as disability and trauma theory, he examines how these disarticulate figures reveal modernityOCOs anxieties in terms of how it constructs its others."

The Trickster Figure in American Literature

release date: Oct 23, 2013
The Trickster Figure in American Literature
This book analyzes and offers fresh insights into the trickster tradition including African American, American Indian, Euro-American, Asian American, and Latino/a stories, Morgan examines the oral roots of each racial/ethnic group to reveal how each group''s history, frustrations, and aspirations have molded the tradition in contemporary literature.
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